Bitcoin Mining Using Raspberry Pi : 8 Steps (with Pictures ...

Is bitcoin mining off of a raspberry pi worth it?

submitted by Tipsfadora to btc [link] [comments]

Is bitcoin mining off of a raspberry pi worth it? /r/btc

Is bitcoin mining off of a raspberry pi worth it? /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why Osana takes so long? (Programmer's point of view on current situation)

I decided to write a comment about «Why Osana takes so long?» somewhere and what can be done to shorten this time. It turned into a long essay. Here's TL;DR of it:
The cost of never paying down this technical debt is clear; eventually the cost to deliver functionality will become so slow that it is easy for a well-designed competitive software product to overtake the badly-designed software in terms of features. In my experience, badly designed software can also lead to a more stressed engineering workforce, in turn leading higher staff churn (which in turn affects costs and productivity when delivering features). Additionally, due to the complexity in a given codebase, the ability to accurately estimate work will also disappear.
Junade Ali, Mastering PHP Design Patterns (2016)
Longer version: I am not sure if people here wanted an explanation from a real developer who works with C and with relatively large projects, but I am going to do it nonetheless. I am not much interested in Yandere Simulator nor in this genre in general, but this particular development has a lot to learn from for any fellow programmers and software engineers to ensure that they'll never end up in Alex's situation, especially considering that he is definitely not the first one to got himself knee-deep in the development hell (do you remember Star Citizen?) and he is definitely not the last one.
On the one hand, people see that Alex works incredibly slowly, equivalent of, like, one hour per day, comparing it with, say, Papers, Please, the game that was developed in nine months from start to finish by one guy. On the other hand, Alex himself most likely thinks that he works until complete exhaustion each day. In fact, I highly suspect that both those sentences are correct! Because of the mistakes made during early development stages, which are highly unlikely to be fixed due to the pressure put on the developer right now and due to his overall approach to coding, cost to add any relatively large feature (e.g. Osana) can be pretty much comparable to the cost of creating a fan game from start to finish. Trust me, I've seen his leaked source code (don't tell anybody about that) and I know what I am talking about. The largest problem in Yandere Simulator right now is its super slow development. So, without further ado, let's talk about how «implementing the low hanging fruit» crippled the development and, more importantly, what would have been an ideal course of action from my point of view to get out. I'll try to explain things in the easiest terms possible.
  1. else if's and lack any sort of refactoring in general
The most «memey» one. I won't talk about the performance though (switch statement is not better in terms of performance, it is a myth. If compiler detects some code that can be turned into a jump table, for example, it will do it, no matter if it is a chain of if's or a switch statement. Compilers nowadays are way smarter than one might think). Just take a look here. I know that it's his older JavaScript code, but, believe it or not, this piece is still present in C# version relatively untouched.
I refactored this code for you using C language (mixed with C++ since there's no this pointer in pure C). Take a note that else if's are still there, else if's are not the problem by itself.
The refactored code is just objectively better for one simple reason: it is shorter, while not being obscure, and now it should be able to handle, say, Trespassing and Blood case without any input from the developer due to the usage of flags. Basically, the shorter your code, the more you can see on screen without spreading your attention too much. As a rule of thumb, the less lines there are, the easier it is for you to work with the code. Just don't overkill that, unless you are going to participate in International Obfuscated C Code Contest. Let me reiterate:
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
This is why refactoring — activity of rewriting your old code so it does the same thing, but does it quicker, in a more generic way, in less lines or simpler — is so powerful. In my experience, you can only keep one module/class/whatever in your brain if it does not exceed ~1000 lines, maybe ~1500. Splitting 17000-line-long class into smaller classes probably won't improve performance at all, but it will make working with parts of this class way easier.
Is it too late now to start refactoring? Of course NO: better late than never.
  1. Comments
If you think that you wrote this code, so you'll always easily remember it, I have some bad news for you: you won't. In my experience, one week and that's it. That's why comments are so crucial. It is not necessary to put a ton of comments everywhere, but just a general idea will help you out in the future. Even if you think that It Just Works™ and you'll never ever need to fix it. Time spent to write and debug one line of code almost always exceeds time to write one comment in large-scale projects. Moreover, the best code is the code that is self-evident. In the example above, what the hell does (float) 6 mean? Why not wrap it around into the constant with a good, self-descriptive name? Again, it won't affect performance, since C# compiler is smart enough to silently remove this constant from the real code and place its value into the method invocation directly. Such constants are here for you.
I rewrote my code above a little bit to illustrate this. With those comments, you don't have to remember your code at all, since its functionality is outlined in two tiny lines of comments above it. Moreover, even a person with zero knowledge in programming will figure out the purpose of this code. It took me less than half a minute to write those comments, but it'll probably save me quite a lot of time of figuring out «what was I thinking back then» one day.
Is it too late now to start adding comments? Again, of course NO. Don't be lazy and redirect all your typing from «debunk» page (which pretty much does the opposite of debunking, but who am I to judge you here?) into some useful comments.
  1. Unit testing
This is often neglected, but consider the following. You wrote some code, you ran your game, you saw a new bug. Was it introduced right now? Is it a problem in your older code which has shown up just because you have never actually used it until now? Where should you search for it? You have no idea, and you have one painful debugging session ahead. Just imagine how easier it would be if you've had some routines which automatically execute after each build and check that environment is still sane and nothing broke on a fundamental level. This is called unit testing, and yes, unit tests won't be able to catch all your bugs, but even getting 20% of bugs identified at the earlier stage is a huge boon to development speed.
Is it too late now to start adding unit tests? Kinda YES and NO at the same time. Unit testing works best if it covers the majority of project's code. On the other side, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. If you decide to start refactoring your code, writing a unit test before refactoring will help you to prove to yourself that you have not broken anything without the need of running the game at all.
  1. Static code analysis
This is basically pretty self-explanatory. You set this thing once, you forget about it. Static code analyzer is another «free estate» to speed up the development process by finding tiny little errors, mostly silly typos (do you think that you are good enough in finding them? Well, good luck catching x << 4; in place of x <<= 4; buried deep in C code by eye!). Again, this is not a silver bullet, it is another tool which will help you out with debugging a little bit along with the debugger, unit tests and other things. You need every little bit of help here.
Is it too late now to hook up static code analyzer? Obviously NO.
  1. Code architecture
Say, you want to build Osana, but then you decided to implement some feature, e.g. Snap Mode. By doing this you have maybe made your game a little bit better, but what you have just essentially done is complicated your life, because now you should also write Osana code for Snap Mode. The way game architecture is done right now, easter eggs code is deeply interleaved with game logic, which leads to code «spaghettifying», which in turn slows down the addition of new features, because one has to consider how this feature would work alongside each and every old feature and easter egg. Even if it is just gazing over one line per easter egg, it adds up to the mess, slowly but surely.
A lot of people mention that developer should have been doing it in object-oritented way. However, there is no silver bullet in programming. It does not matter that much if you are doing it object-oriented way or usual procedural way; you can theoretically write, say, AI routines on functional (e.g. LISP)) or even logical language if you are brave enough (e.g. Prolog). You can even invent your own tiny programming language! The only thing that matters is code quality and avoiding the so-called shotgun surgery situation, which plagues Yandere Simulator from top to bottom right now. Is there a way of adding a new feature without interfering with your older code (e.g. by creating a child class which will encapsulate all the things you need, for example)? Go for it, this feature is basically «free» for you. Otherwise you'd better think twice before doing this, because you are going into the «technical debt» territory, borrowing your time from the future by saying «I'll maybe optimize it later» and «a thousand more lines probably won't slow me down in the future that much, right?». Technical debt will incur interest on its own that you'll have to pay. Basically, the entire situation around Osana right now is just a huge tale about how just «interest» incurred by technical debt can control the entire project, like the tail wiggling the dog.
I won't elaborate here further, since it'll take me an even larger post to fully describe what's wrong about Yandere Simulator's code architecture.
Is it too late to rebuild code architecture? Sadly, YES, although it should be possible to split Student class into descendants by using hooks for individual students. However, code architecture can be improved by a vast margin if you start removing easter eggs and features like Snap Mode that currently bloat Yandere Simulator. I know it is going to be painful, but it is the only way to improve code quality here and now. This will simplify the code, and this will make it easier for you to add the «real» features, like Osana or whatever you'd like to accomplish. If you'll ever want them back, you can track them down in Git history and re-implement them one by one, hopefully without performing the shotgun surgery this time.
  1. Loading times
Again, I won't be talking about the performance, since you can debug your game on 20 FPS as well as on 60 FPS, but this is a very different story. Yandere Simulator is huge. Once you fixed a bug, you want to test it, right? And your workflow right now probably looks like this:
  1. Fix the code (unavoidable time loss)
  2. Rebuild the project (can take a loooong time)
  3. Load your game (can take a loooong time)
  4. Test it (unavoidable time loss, unless another bug has popped up via unit testing, code analyzer etc.)
And you can fix it. For instance, I know that Yandere Simulator makes all the students' photos during loading. Why should that be done there? Why not either move it to project building stage by adding build hook so Unity does that for you during full project rebuild, or, even better, why not disable it completely or replace with «PLACEHOLDER» text for debug builds? Each second spent watching the loading screen will be rightfully interpreted as «son is not coding» by the community.
Is it too late to reduce loading times? Hell NO.
  1. Jenkins
Or any other continuous integration tool. «Rebuild a project» can take a long time too, and what can we do about that? Let me give you an idea. Buy a new PC. Get a 32-core Threadripper, 32 GB of fastest RAM you can afford and a cool motherboard which would support all of that (of course, Ryzen/i5/Celeron/i386/Raspberry Pi is fine too, but the faster, the better). The rest is not necessary, e.g. a barely functional second hand video card burned out by bitcoin mining is fine. You set up another PC in your room. You connect it to your network. You set up ramdisk to speed things up even more. You properly set up Jenkins) on this PC. From now on, Jenkins cares about the rest: tracking your Git repository, (re)building process, large and time-consuming unit tests, invoking static code analyzer, profiling, generating reports and whatever else you can and want to hook up. More importantly, you can fix another bug while Jenkins is rebuilding the project for the previous one et cetera.
In general, continuous integration is a great technology to quickly track down errors that were introduced in previous versions, attempting to avoid those kinds of bug hunting sessions. I am highly unsure if continuous integration is needed for 10000-20000 source lines long projects, but things can be different as soon as we step into the 100k+ territory, and Yandere Simulator by now has approximately 150k+ source lines of code. I think that probably continuous integration might be well worth it for Yandere Simulator.
Is it too late to add continuous integration? NO, albeit it is going to take some time and skills to set up.
  1. Stop caring about the criticism
Stop comparing Alex to Scott Cawton. IMO Alex is very similar to the person known as SgtMarkIV, the developer of Brutal Doom, who is also a notorious edgelord who, for example, also once told somebody to kill himself, just like… However, being a horrible person, SgtMarkIV does his job. He simply does not care much about public opinion. That's the difference.
  1. Go outside
Enough said. Your brain works slower if you only think about games and if you can't provide it with enough oxygen supply. I know that this one is probably the hardest to implement, but…
That's all, folks.
Bonus: Do you think how short this list would have been if someone just simply listened to Mike Zaimont instead of breaking down in tears?
submitted by Dezhitse to Osana [link] [comments]

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

https://preview.redd.it/kcdq7qrjnyd51.jpg?width=570&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=af67bd46683fbe3ffa6c081d490d69598dd83bbb
1. When do you contact Bitcoin? What do you think of the blockchain industry?
I came into contact with Bitcoin in October 2013. At that time, I was making game aids, which involved the issue of collecting money from Taiwan and Southeast Asia.
The reason for cultivating the blockchain industry is that blockchain is the only industry that can provide economic freedom. The blockchain is decentralized and has no control center, so no one can eliminate it, so it provides economic freedom. The counter-example is Qvod player. Although Qvod player also has tens of thousands of nodes, it is centralized. As long as the control center is killed, the Qvod player network will die. (QvodPlayer is a Chinese-based video-on-demand playback software, using P2P technology, users can watch online film and television programs through buffering. In mainland China, QvodPlayer has a huge number of users. Due to the use of a dedicated transmission protocol, QvodPlayer is used by some users to download banned videos, such as violent or pornographic videos, and politically sensitive videos. In addition, pirated movies are rampant in QvodPlayer)
I am not a Bitcoinist. As long as other tokens provide economic freedom, I will buy them with real money. My position portfolio is BCH 40% + BTC 30% + ETH 20% + economically free innovative currency 10%, and I think that ETH is likely to exceed BTC in total market value in this bull market.
2. What is the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV?
The easiest thing to see is the difference in block size. BTC blocks have been locked at about 1MB, while BSV advocates infinite blocks. BCH advocates a moderate block size, which cannot exceed the carrying capacity of an ordinary computer. The current value is about 32MB.
Both BTC and BSV have gone to extremes. The BTC development team, Core, pursues extreme decentralization, resulting in too small blocks and high transaction fees. In the last bull market, a transaction fee was as high as hundreds of thousands of yuan, which caused a large number of BTC users to flow out to BCH, ETH and other tokens.
Some people think that BTC can rely entirely on stored-value users instead of using users to survive. This is impossible. If there are no users, there are no stored value users. For example, gold is obviously more suitable for storing value, but almost everyone has bank deposits, except for the elderly, almost no one uses gold to store value. To
People usually use paper money to store value, and naturally they also use paper money to store value. It is impossible to use paper money to store value with gold, and it is impossible to use paper money for small transactions and gold for large transactions. Currency has a scale effect, and it must be a winner takes all.
BSV has gone to the other extreme. The blockchain is enough to store transaction data, but if the blockchain is used as cloud storage, no amount of space is enough. Think about how many resources the world has to store. The result is that the performance requirements are too high, the number of nodes is drastically reduced, and the foundation of the blockchain, which is decentralization, is lost. In the end, it falls into the same fate as the Qvod player. To
Behind the different block sizes are the differences in the spirit of the three. Just like during the Opium War, the difference between Britain and China's Qing Dynasty was not a superficial weapon, but a complete political, economic, and technological gap behind it.
Both BTC and BSV are irrational and religious to a certain extent. BTC advocates a deadlock block size, and BSV advocates a deadlock protocol. The two are very similar.
In terms of rational development and serving users, BCH has won. For example, the issuance of tokens is an important function and rigid demand of the blockchain. Tokens can already be issued on BCH through several protocols such as Wormhole and SLP, while BTC and BSV cannot yet. This is a huge difference in development.
3. Under what circumstances can BCH exceed BTC?
BCH has to wait for users to slowly develop until the number of users and transactions exceed BTC. Although under normal circumstances, the currency has a scale effect, this situation is unlikely to happen, but BTC made a fatal mistake, and locked the block and locked the user.
What if BTC expands like BCH?
First of all, BTC cannot be expanded because the expansion requires a hard fork, regardless of whether it is within the community or the Core, it must adhere to 1MB, insist on extreme decentralization, and BTC must be able to run on the Raspberry Pi. The result is that the expansion advocates in BTC and Core re-hard fork.
Isn't this the plot of the hard fork of BCH from BTC in 2017? So what are these "advocates" doing hard forking again? Just go straight to BCH.
Therefore, BTC must undergo a hard fork to expand, so it cannot be expanded.
So BCH only needs to catch up, which is a fixed goal. I estimate that in this bull market, BCH can exceed the number of users. At that time, BCH had a solid foundation of users and communities. The price increase only increases the price of BCH, the value of BCH is determined by the number of users, and the price fluctuates around the value.
4. Will BCH hard fork happen? What impact will it have on us later?
The BCH community has recently had a lot of discussions on the issue of miner donations, which reflects the decentralization of BCH.
If BCH is controlled by bitmain, why it took a long time for bitmain to implement this problem? Conversely, if CSW wants to modify something on BSV, it can be passed immediately.
5. Do you think BCH is worth long-term ownership?
I often say: "Ask God in the short term, and the number of users in the long term."
The longer the time, the more worth holding BCH. BCH is developing rapidly due to the correct route. I just gave an example. There are already several schemes for issuing tokens on BCH, but neither BTC nor BSV have one. Part of it is because BSV locks the protocol and is not convenient for development. The other part It is because the BSV community has inherited the characteristics of CSW and only speaks big words and does not do practical things.
Therefore, it is definitely worth holding for 1 to 2 years, and the rate of increase is likely to be higher than that of BTC. I predict that the highest point of this round of bull market for BCH will rise from about 3.6% of BTC to 10% to 20% of BTC.
8. Free Q&A
"Will Bitcoin die due to quantum computers or other reasons?"
Certainly not, at best, replace a quantum-resistant algorithm. Looking at it now, quantum computers will not be practical for a long time. And I think quantum computers may not be able to solve the NP problem, that is, the current asymmetric encryption problem, which may not be possible mathematically.
"The impact of the proliferation of contract transactions on currency prices?"
The currency price is ultimately determined by the number of users, not by speculative users. The proliferation of futures trading has happened long ago. From 2016 to 2017, in the presence of a large number of futures trading, BTC rose 100 times.
"Will you be notified when you escape?"
I will definitely not inform. I have already made predictions. I think the bull market may end in the second half of 2021. Or conversely, this bull market may last for two to three years, and two years are more likely.
Why not notify? Most of my clients are miners, and the currency price directly affects the income of the miners. If the currency price drops due to my notification, the interests of my clients will be damaged.
"Recommended regular investment in 2019, what strategy is recommended in 2020?"
This year's bull market has begun, and it must be a full position investment. The cost of regular investment to buy coins later is very high.
"Is it better to speculate or to mine now?"
Most people can't insist on holding the token from start to finish. Most people are in the middle of the bull market, or even sell it at the beginning, and then miss the entire bull market.
Only miners, no matter what level of miners, will hold the token from beginning to end. During the entire bull market, miners are very profitable. Miners will certainly not sell the goose that lays golden eggs like mining machines in the bull market, so miners tend to make more. The earliest miners are basically still active in the market, and their wealth is free, while the earliest holders of coins are almost gone.
submitted by paulcheung1990 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

My career isn’t always dangerous, but clients can be unpredictable

My name is Amy, and I’m what’s called a Computer Dominatrix. My clients are all long distance, we never interact face-to-face, and I have control over all of them. Some give me absolute control, some give me specific portions with boundaries. Some are married or dating, others are single. They all make use of my talents to give up control of at least part of their lives.
When a new client contacts me, we exchange a few messages so I have some background about them, and I lay out what my services usually entail. I tell a few stories of what other clients have asked me to do for them, to help the new client select scenarios they would like to set up. Most of my clients have never had a Digital Dom before. So, giving them a few examples and options helps bolster their confidence.
The usual set-up goes like this: my client installs some spyware on their computer that I control. It gives me the power to do things like lock their computer, see their screen, disable the keyboard, take over control of their computer, and get reports of what they’re doing on their computer. With this tool, I can perform my services.
Some clients want me to watch their bank statements and shame them if they spend too much money or buy surprise things with their money as if I own the account. Other clients want me to monitor their porn usage and shame them for what they look up. Or, if I log in and catch them using porn, I should direct them to different porn of my choosing and force them to watch that instead. One even wanted me to try and break into his computer and install the spyware secretly. That was a fun client to work with.
When it comes down to it, they just want to relinquish a little control over their lives. I understand where their desires come from, and knowing it helps me be a better Dom.
Contrasting the fun times of my career, I’ve had a few mishaps and horrible things happen.
I had one client sign up for my services. We messaged a few times to get to know one another before I agreed to accept him as a client. He was in his mid thirties, single, and wanted me to watch him look at porn and make random comments on the things he was watching.
Really, not that abnormal for my choice of career.
I had him sign an agreement that helps me avoid legal trouble if they try to report me for hacking (had this happen before), and we got started. I gave him the url where he could install my personal spyware, and he followed through.
He only asked that I give him a little advance notice before I start watching, which I agreed to. Boundaries are important.
I would check up on him twice a week, and send him a message before I did saying “I’m coming to check on you in ten minutes, you better be watching something good.” I would log in ten minutes later to the second and start either shaming him for his choice of videos or praise him for making the “right” choice. All of this was predetermined.
Things were going fine with this client, and I balanced him with about 10 others. Being a Digital Dom makes it easy to spread your attention across many clients. Bonus if you can get clients from different time zones so they would log in at different times so you don’t have to multitask.
I was about to check in with another client, when I mis-clicked in my software. See, my spyware (which I paid to be custom written after wishing for more features in commercial tools) lists my clients by most recently connected in one screen. When I add a new client, it can mess with the order of the page I am so used to mindlessly clicking through. I’ve since paid for that to get fixed and sort clients alphabetically, but this time I made a mistake.
I clicked on this new client and connected to his computer.
A gasp escaped my lips as I saw what he was looking at. I’ll leave that up to your imagination. It was some of the most fucked up porn I’ve ever seen. Involving victims of questionable age. And blood.
If I could have slipped out of there, I would have. But this client requested a popup to appear whenever I connected so he would know I was there.
That popup revealed my unexpected presence.
Instead of panicking and trying to close the window, he calmly moved his mouse to the task bar and opened a text document. I was frozen while watching him type. I should have logged straight out, but I instead started to open a voice channel to tell him I was dropping him as a client.
It was too much for me, and I decided to set that boundary early on in my career.
“Like what you see?”
He had typed into the word document, and the cursor blinked impatiently at me.
I thought my voice would crack, so I took over the keyboard and typed back.
“I’m sorry, but I’m going to refund your money and no longer service you. Please uninstall this software and watch for your refund.”
He paused for a while, and I waited for him to respond once before I disconnected. He took too long, so I closed the window and took a deep breath while sitting back.
I was feeling really disconcerted from what I’d watched. It wasn’t the first time a client had tried to show me illegal things during a session, but it always makes me sick when they do. I gave the reins over to another Digital Dom I have partnered with. We take over for each other if we feel ill or something. Just temporarily.
I went to take a shower to wash out those images.
 
My computer started acting up more than a month later. So much had gone on since dropping that client that I didn’t connect the two at first.
The computer would slow down for a few minutes, then resume its normal speed. I assumed it was because I hadn’t restarted in a while, so I restarted it. That seemed to fix the problem.
When I had rebooted, the wifi slowed down considerably, enough for my roommate, Jess, to ask if I was downloading anything big. I had logged into the router to see if that also needed to be restarted when I noticed a device I didn’t recognize was connected to the wifi.
I swallowed hard.
RASPI was the name of the connected device. It had connected to the network three days ago.
Some strangers' device was on our network. And they had to be nearby, at least within range of wifi. I immediately suspected that a neighbor had brute forced our wifi password and was now stealing internet.
Before kicking the device off, I looked at the router’s traffic report. The device had a significant size of traffic in the last few days, but my computer used the most out of all of our devices. The device came in 5th place for most data used.
It made sense that my computer was using so much bandwidth, but 75+ gigabytes in 3 days was excessive.
My throat seized, and I immediately reached around to the back of my computer and unplugged the ethernet cable.
Deep, primal panic set in. This was a very specific attack. It’s not the kind of hacking you can do en masse to install some ransomware or adware.
Someone was targeting me or both of us.
Someone who was willing to spend time brute forcing a wifi password and going after one specific machine on the network.
 
I called Lucas, the guy I hired to write my spyware for me, and filled him in on everything I knew. He knows perfectly well what his software is used for and isn’t weird about it. He agreed to take a look at my computer for a fee.
So, trusting him as I have all my career, I installed a commercial remote desktop tool and let him connect. The moment I reconnected the computer to the internet, the router showed a spike in traffic again.
I had him on a call while he worked, and I watched what he did carefully, trying my best to learn what he was doing so I could troubleshoot myself if this ever happened again.
“Oh shit,” Lucas muttered. He had a traffic analyzer and computer process analyzer open on-screen. “Amy, I think you got hacked. Like, they’re downloading your hard drive!”
“They’re what?!” I began to really panic. I had a lot of my clients information on this machine. Keys that let me log into their machines. Bitcoin Cash addresses and keys where I stored my fees.
Now someone had them. They could easily start stealing and spending my thousands in accumulated fees and harass my clients.
I’d lose a big chunk of my savings and my livelihood.
Immediately, I took over the computer and shut Lucas out while I created new crypto addresses and started transferring money. The fees from transferring would make me lose a little money, but it was better than losing it all.
I also started backing up the hard drive to several USB drives I had lying around. Just the important stuff like my files, personal photos, and client info.
When I let Lucas back in, he got to work finding the process that was exfiltrating my data and shutting it down. He tracked down the executable that was running the show and downloaded it to his own computer before deleting it from mine.
He promised to dissect it as best he could to figure out what it was doing.
Before he did that, however, he started monitoring my system to make sure the virus had been truly cleared out.
While watching my system, he gave me a task.
“Walk around your apartment. Search everywhere and look for that rogue device. It’s been continuously connected for days, which means whoever is doing this is probably not camped out on the road. From the name, I’d guess it’s a Raspberry Pi -- a small computer about the size of a phone but two inches tall.”
He sent me a picture of the type of device we were looking for.
“They probably left it hidden somewhere, either connected to an outlet or with a large battery pack. Go and look for it,” he insisted.
I got Jess to help me search the place top to bottom. Nothing. Not even outside in the bushes or on the back porch.
We split up and went to our neighbors, asking if they’d seen anyone suspicious hanging around the building in the last week. No one on our floor had. I went upstairs and asked the same questions.
Our upstairs neighbor said the only person he’d seen was a guy coming to update their satellite dish on the balcony. My throat seized up as I realized that could be them.
I asked hesitantly if I could look at their dish. I didn’t know them, but briefly explained that someone had left a device lying around that was breaking into our wifi and that our next step was to call the police.
They panicked at that, and let me check their balcony if I promised to keep them out of it if I called the cops. I agreed, knowing full well that they did drugs and would hate for the police to come around the apartment complex.
There, on the balcony, was exactly what Lucas had told me to look for. A black box sat along the wall between the satellite and the wall the cable ran into. A power cord exited the box and connected to an outlet on the balcony.
I cracked open the box with my fingers and found a circuit board inside, connected via usb to the outlet. The satellite cable passed straight through the box without connecting to anything. The box was a fake, made to look like it was doing something to the cable as it passed through.
The circuit board looked exactly like the picture Lucas had shown me.
There was our rogue device.
I unplugged the device, fully aware that unplugging it would alert whoever was controlling it. They could assume it was disconnected accidentally, or they would think I had found it. Either way, I couldn’t just leave it.
I thanked the neighbors and left with the whole box. Jess met me on the stairs, saying that Lucas had asked her to disconnect the internet on the computer and have me call him back.
Jess stared in wide-eyed shock as I showed her what I’d found. The upstairs neighbors were well within range of our wifi for the device to connect. The job was only barely sloppy enough to detect. We were lucky I had found it at all.
 
On the phone Lucas sounded panicked.
“They didn’t just copy your hard drive, they added files to it,” he squeaked. “Bad files. Bad pictures.”
My jaw tightened, and I felt sick. I made the connection to the client I’d dropped.
“Delete all your shit now,” Lucas was demanding. “You already backed up what you want, you need to destroy that hard drive. Smash it, burn it, bury it. Go get a new hard drive. Start as fresh as you can. I can help you get set back up if you want.”
“I think I know what’ll happen,” I muttered. “He’ll call the police on me and tip them off that I have those… pictures. They’ll find it and arrest me for possession. Game over.”
“He? You know who it is?” Lucas pressed.
I told him about the client I’d dropped.
“That’s why you need to torch your hard drives. Now. Both of you. Same with your phones. Who knows where else he’s been,” was Lucas’ advice.
I won’t confirm or deny what I did with the hard drive or the device. If I destroyed it, it would technically be destruction of evidence.
I ordered a new hard drive and reinstalled everything. I explained to my clients that I had lost internet connection for a couple of days, and didn’t end up losing any clients.
I haven’t told the police everything. The last time I got involved with them, there was so much harassment from them about my career that I’d rather not have more negative interactions with them. It just isn’t worth it in this case. I kept my report short and simple: a guy I met online and dumped might try something and come to my house. I gave them the information the client gave me, but I suspect more and more that it was fake.
Making a report will help if anything new happens.
I’ve written about this before on other anonymous forums, specifically for other Doms. Because of those posts, a few journalists have reached out and are writing features based on me, my career, and these events. They should be published in the next few days.
I’m just interested in sharing stories like this as publicly as possible, for awareness.
Lucas explained that the Raspberry Pi was a tiny computer that had a cellular connection so the client could connect to it from anywhere in the world and try to break into my wifi. Once he had succeeded, the client had gone to work breaking into my computer and getting their malware installed. We still don’t know 100% how he did it.
Lucas worked tirelessly to revise his software and remove vulnerabilities that could be used to trace me. We don’t know which vulnerabilities the client used, if any. We do know that there is one left, however.
I know this because every once in a while, a client will show up in my software who I didn’t sign up. A new name and data every time. I don’t dare click it. I just know what will be waiting for me upon connection.
“Like what you see?”
Lucas hasn’t been able to track down how he’s injecting fake clients into the software. Until Lucas can fix it, all I can do is click carefully and not connect again by accident. I’m sure the client is using a modified version of my spyware, ready to do all kinds of damage the moment I connect.
The guy is clearly an expert. Who knows how many other people he’s done something like this to. One thing is certain: he was prepared to conduct this attack.
My career isn’t always dangerous, but the clients can be unpredictable.
submitted by DigitDom to nosleep [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
Some great introductions for new users are My first bitcoin, Bitcoin explained and ELI5 Bitcoin. Also, the following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Also have to give mention to Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here, here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. Potential upcoming protocol improvements here. Scaling resources here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!), and of course Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper that started it all! :)
Key properties of bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org, BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Gemini Bitstamp LocalBitcoins
Bitstamp Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
BitFinex Cex.io LibertyX
Cex.io CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo Spectrocoin BitcoinOTC
Kraken Luno BitQuick
itBit
HitBTC
Bitit
Bisq (decentralized)
Luno
Spectrocoin
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Samouari BreadWallet Electrum
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for some good options, some of the more commons ones are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, Overstock, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Streamium.io, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Fatum, vol. 1 [Chapters 6 - 8]

Chapter 0, Chapter 1, Chapters 2,3, Chapter 4 - 5.4
Chapter 6
One of the main reasons suicide is so upsetting for people is because of finances. Dying is really quite expensive from burials to funerals, to receptions; then there are the accessories that come with death: having your corpse beautified, the nice wooden bed they make to lower your body into the ground, and the cute stone head that has your date of birth, date of death, and name on it. And someone has to get paid decently for these things, as dealing with dead bodies can be troublesome for a lot of people. So these expenses add up, and when you kill yourself you tack on a slew of unexpected debts that someone will have to pay for, it just won’t be you. He chose to treat his death a little differently.
At her workstation, Bell has a distinct coldness in her voice. She swivels around in her chair absent-mindedly, half- heartedly hoping that somehow an Earthly force would relieve her of these arbitrary responsibilities. She begins to space out, as So Many Details by Toro Y Moi blasts off of her Alexa. Revisiting her past life before meeting Him, she remembers always being curious about exploring the world and getting to learn more about how the human mind worked in a collective form. Their first meeting was one where she found herself unable to reign in her curiosity. Even during His prepubescent years, He was clearly the master of His own universe, figuratively, and she picked up on this immediately. They spent the entire night, until their bedtimes at least, getting to know one another. Finding and appreciating both similarities and differences right off the bat probably had a lot to do with the relationship they shared.
But Bell’s existence was also necessary. Although she is blissfully unaware, her companionship with Him is what sparked His deep dive into answers for reasons of existence. She holds herself morally and emotionally liable for His suicide, consistently flashing back to the last words she said to him while he was alive:
““You never loved me, if you do this, you could have never loved me.””
Thinking aloud, startled by the sound of emotion in her own voice,
“So stupid. I’m so stupid. He tells me this is His last day on Earth and I immediately tried to emotionally blackmail him. He really prepared all of us for His departure, but I was never ready to let Him go. I still am not ready, but I know He loved me and I loved Him so I will follow His final instructions. Alexa, activate Protocol Stardust.”
“Searching... Protocol Stardust located. My condolences, Bell.”
“Thanks Alexa but He recommended I turn down condolences. He never wanted people to be sad over His death...”
“Protocol Stardust... 10% Loaded.”
“I just really can’t believe it’s actually happening. I would make a bad habit of indulging with Him in His laughter when we talked about it.”
“Protocol Stardust... 30% Loaded.”
“I mean, who thinks like that? Who even jokes like that? To have your body cremated is one thing, but then to have your ashes spread out into space?”
“Protocol Stardust... 50% Loaded.”
“And then the Bastard went and accommodated Himself. Every time someone would mention the implausibility of His plan He was so calmly confident He would be able to achieve it before His last day.”
“Protocol Stardust... 70% Loaded.”
“Of course He succeeded. All of our fates were sealed when He talked his mom into getting him his first Raspberry Pi. He cashed out in cryptocurrency and had been living on His own time ever since, like some character out of a movie.”
“Protocol Stardust... 99% Loaded.”
“I miss you so much.”
“Protocol Stardust Ready to Execute. Please Provide Final Voice Confirmation.”
The glass finish on her iPhone X felt impossibly smooth in her palm. She chuckled to herself slightly, thinking back to when the iPhone X was first announced and how He had lost His cool that Apple stole the aesthetic from his niche YouTube channel to market the new phone. She knew no one would believe Him, but she genuinely did. She was right to, because maybe they did, but now it seemed like an even greater injustice against His reality that she didn’t fight harder. It wouldn’t have been what He wanted anyway. She positions her phone's camera to catch enough of her facial profile to utilize Face ID. Gently tapping the screen with her thumb, as if to nudge the device awake, the screen glows bright yellow with the custom parallax wallpaper He had designed for her. The text was placed perfect center, reading out ‘“DEATH IS ARTIFICIAL”, with a 1 px fill line striking through the circle of letters, highlighting a hidden message: ‘”DEATH IS ART’”.
Chapter 7
“I can’t believe this shit.”
“Honey, relax. You know He’ll make you whole.”
“Please don’t refer to Him and holes in the same sentence.”
“You're being immature. I know it’s still touchy.”
“I really didn’t think it would bother me as much as it does. I love Him but He takes it too far.”
Blood recirculating into his wrists, Ohsa rubs them gently with his index and middle fingers to soothe himself, because of both the grueling discomfort he had just endured and because of his own doubts if his Friend would be okay.
“Thank goodness you reminded me we were out of pesto sauce. Who knows what would’ve happened if He saw me.”
“What’s that supposed to mean?”
“It means he could’ve tied both of us up and left us here.”
“Oh.”
“This is the last time I go through this: I was down with the orgy but as soon as He got close to me my senses were completely overwhelmed. His words felt like silk flowing into my ears, and the way He smelled – my God His smell,”
“...You said you had felt like you had become a different person.”
Catching herself she resumes, “Yes but no. Now that I think about it, it wasn’t that I was a different person. I was still me, completely me, rolling me, but He was just purely irresistible in that moment. Whoever slept with Him, though, was not the woman that loves you.”
“How do I know you’re not lying?”
“Because I’m trying to communicate with you about it, as opposed to shifting blame. Listen honey, He fucked the shit out of me in the middle of an orgy of people. I can’t stand here and pretend like it didn’t happen or I didn’t enjoy it or I had been so drugged up I didn’t know what I was doing. But when it happened it did, and I was there.”
“What the fuck. I can’t think about this right now. What the hell happened out there? I felt two separate explosions while I was tied up.”
“He destroyed the elevator shaft and the entire left side of the hallway, including part of the door to the stairway. My Twitter Moments feed is saying at least 4 SWAT officers are reported to be in critical condition.”
“What is He thinking?! How is killing cops supposed to help His cool down??”
“Don’t you think He’s been acting a little too wild lately?”
“I’ve seen Him comeback from worse, honestly.”
“Worse than a killing spree?”
“No, I meant drug-wise.”
“Was He high when you saw him?”
“He was definitely on the comedown. I don’t think He was actively stoned but he wasn’t entirely sober, either.”
“Well, regardless he was clear-headed enough to stay ahead of the cops.”
“Cops are fucking idiots.”
Chapter 8
We never know what the future is until we get there. We like to imagine it as augmented reality everywhere, digital on top of reality, seamlessly intertwined together, persisting without being invasive. The truth is, the future is now. All time, past, present, and future, all exist tangentially and concurrently to each other. The 2008 American Recession hit Bell’s parents where it mattered the most: Their bank accounts. It hit at the least opportune time, right as they were preparing to make a class transition from poverty-level to lower middle class. Not only was their savings obliterated, but their morale too. Maybe this spiritual blow was exactly what she needed, maybe it was another unnecessary inconvenience that came with simply trying to exist as a human, but earlier that year she had her first meeting with Him.
Even as children, Him and Bell always had a special connection. Everyone around them could see as clear as day, that these two were in love, even before they knew it for themselves. Almost a year ago to the day, He had made a discovery. Bitcoin was going to crash, and it was going to crash hard. It was clearly being inflated by whales who were egging on spectators but He correctly assumed that the dramatic rise had gotten way too out of hand for anyone to control. Come end of November under the guise of Christmas spirit he traded all of his leftover Team Fortress 2 hats, convincing other players to complete trades in crypto, tricking those who were ignorant to the true value of BTC. He had already amassed a sizeable enough wallet during His early mining days but that extra week of trading is what took him from safety to comfort.
In literally the exact moment the BTC exchange rate was estimated at $20,500 for one coin, he cashed in his entire wallet of 14,634.14163414 Bitcoin, becoming a multi-millionaire overnight, having earned a net worth just shy of $300 Million USD. He excitedly made his first phone call of the night reaching out to Bell.
“Hey Siri, call Bell.”
“Calling Bell – Mobile”
“Hey, what’s up?”
“Not too much. What’s up with you?”
“Oh nothing, just getting ready for bed. I have work early in the afternoon tomorrow but I want to try to get to the gym in the morning. The only way I won’t be exhausted is if I go to sleep now.”
“Yeah, that's cool. Hypothetically, yeah, if your time wasn’t filled up with working a menial job, what would you do?”
“Honestly I’d love to finish getting my Graduate’s degree, maybe go back to China. I loved my time in Undergrad but it was so tough that I really needed a break. It’s just been so jarring to me how difficult it’s been to get back into academia now that I’m in the real world, you know?”
“OK.”
“What’s up with you? Got some exciting plans for the night? You always have crazy shenanigans under your belt.”
“I swear it just happens to me by accident, but yeah. I’m planning on blowing someone’s mind tonight.”
“Ooh lucky them! What’re you gonna do? A surprise visit? Or buy them a gift? Or is it a secret?”
“It won’t be a secret much longer, I just wanted you to know first.”
“Know what first?”
“I’m filthy rich Bell.”
“What?”
“I’m sitting on a few hundred million dollars.”
“WHAT?”
“What country are you from?”
“What?”
Getting comfortable with his Samuel L. Jackson impersonation, he raises his tone: “’What’ ain’t no country I ever heard of! They speak English in ‘What’?!”
Familiar with the reference but still reeling from the news, Bell plays right into his prank.
“...What?”
“English motherfucker! Do you speak it?!”
“Yes!”
“Then you know what I’m saying?”
“Yes!”
Getting as far as he needed to with the joke, he lets out a boisterous hearty laugh and continues the conversation, back to his usual austere speaking voice.
“Relax, love. Quit your job. Enroll in any school you want. Find a new apartment. Order a mani-pedi to a five star hotel, and then stand up your appointment to go to the casino. Your old life is over.”
Thumb to screen, end call. Before the Phone app can finish spelling out “call ended”, he quickly double taps the home button, finding his Messages app open right behind Notes and Voice Memos. A single text to Bell goes out; to let her know that this is the difference, this is what separates the wheat from the chaff, to let her know that she is now wheat and no longer chaff:
“Painted ultrapure white walls triple coated, a high ceiling, in-wall light fixtures, foliage incorporated into the architecture, soft-close furnishings, and lastly location, location, location.”
Bell takes a moment to read the text. Her mind still, but her heart beating faster, the news truly settling in for the first time. She begins to sob uncontrollably.
submitted by viliscane to libraryofshadows [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - November 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 23rd monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in November 2018
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Research
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
Congratulations Bitcoin on about to be 1 Million subscribers! See you next month!
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers

Hello Vertcoin Community,
Eager to contribute to the Vertcoin Community I began creating step by step walkthrough guides on how to get a Vertcoin node up and running on a Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero and Intel NUC. Along with information to get a Vertcoin node up and running was also optional steps to install p2pool-vtc.
I decided that while this step by step guide might be helpful to a few, a setup script may prove to be useful to a wider range of people. I have this script to a point where I think it may be productive to share with a bigger audience, for those who are brave and have this hardware sitting around or like to tinker with projects; I invite you to test this setup script if you are interested, if you run into errors any sort of verbose console output of the error proves to be extremely helpful in troubleshooting.
The script was designed to produce a “headless” server... meaning we will not be using a GUI to configure Vertcoin or check to see how things are running. In fact, once the server is set up, you will only interact with it using command line calls over SSH. The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Why run a headless node on a Single Board Computer?
The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Required: USB Flash Drive 6GB - 32GB
Please note that the script was designed for Single Board Computers first and looks for an accessible USB Flash Drive to use for storing the blockchain and swap file, as constant writing to a microSD can degrade the health of the microSD.
Supports

Hardware

All of the hardware listed above is hardware that I have personally tested / am testing on myself. The plan is to continue expanding my arsenal of single board computers and continue to add support for more hardware to ensure as much compatibility as possible.
Functionality
It is worth noting that LIT can be ran with multiple configurations, the ones displayed in the Post Installation Report reflect values that run LIT with the Vertcoin Mainnet. Please be aware that the Vertcoin Testnet chain has not been mined 100% of the time in the past, if you make transactions on the Vertcoin testnet that do not go through it is likely because the chain has stopped being mined.
BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR COINS, ONLY TEST WITH WHAT YOU ARE OKAY WITH LOSING IF YOU USE THE MAINNET.

Vertcoin Testnet Coins

https://tvtc.blkidx.org/faucet/
I've included some documentation on LIT I created which includes information I found to be useful: https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode/blob/mastedocs/lit.md
Please visit the mit-dci/lit github repository for the most up to date information on lit: https://github.com/mit-dci/lit

Vertnode | Automated Vertcoin Node Installation Script

https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode

Recommended: Use Etcher to install the chosen OS to your microSD card / USB flash drive.

If you intend on installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 to your Intel NUC please use Etcher to install the .iso to your USB flash drive.
https://etcher.io/
PLEASE NOTE THIS SCRIPT MAY GIVE AN ERROR. THIS IS THE NATURE OF TESTING. PLEASE REPORT YOUR ERRORS IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE FIXED/RESOLVED. THANK YOU FOR BETTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SCRIPT.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 Setup Details

You can use different clients to ssh into your node. One option is using PuTTY or Git Bash on Windows which is included in the desktop version of Git. If you are using Linux you can simply open a new terminal window and ssh to the IP address of your node (hardware you intend installing the Vertcoin node on).
You will need to know the IP address of your node, this can be found on your router page.
ssh 192.168.1.5 -l pi For example, this command uses ssh to login to 192.168.1.5 using the -l login name of pi. The IP address of your node will likely be different for you, in this example I am logging into a Raspberry Pi which has a default login name of pi.
A brief list of commands that can be used to check on the Vertcoin node status:
vertcoin-cli getblockchaininfo | Grab information about your blockchain
vertcoin-cli getblockcount | Grab the current count of blocks on your node
vertcoin-cli getconnectioncount | Grab the current count of connections to your node. A number of connections larger than 8 means that you have incoming connections to your node. The default settings are to make 8 outgoing connections. If you want incoming connections please port forward your Raspberry Pi in your Router settings page.
vertcoin-cli getpeerinfo | Grab the information about the peers you have connected to / are connected to
vertcoin-cli getnettotals | Grab network data, how much downloaded/upload displayed in bytes
tail -f ~/.vertcoin/debug.log | Output the latest lines in the Vertcoin debug.log to see verbose information about the Vertcoin daemon (ctrl+c to stop)
Thank you to all who have helped me and inspired me thus far, @b17z, @jamesl22, @vertcoinmarketingteam, @canen, @flakfired, @etang600, @BDF, @tucker178, @Xer0
This work is dedicated to the users of Vertcoin, thank you for making this possible.
7/20/2018 Thank you @CommodoreAmiga for the incredibly generous tip <3
You can reach me @Sam Sepiol#3396 on the Vertcoin Discord, here on reddit or @ [email protected]
submitted by ecorp-sam-sepiol to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Looking for feedback on DecentraCorp, the worlds first Decentralized Autonomous Corporation(DAC)

Hello ethdev!
I only get one shot to do this right, so here it goes!
My name is Christopher Dixon. I am the founder of DecentraCorp and inventor of IdeaCoin and the CryptoPatent Blockchain. I wasn’t sure of the best route to approach presenting the project so I thought I would give a short history on how it came to be. Since its a long story I will post a link to the alpha version dApp for the project for those who just wish to dive in:
https://decentracorp.now.sh.
The project is currently deployed to the ropsten test network and is not mobile optimized as I’ve hit a problem with IPFS on mobile. The styling of the website is somewhat basic as I am still learning React so I am more than open to any Design tips(or anyone with the knowledge who wants to help out). A web3 enabled Browser is required to use any dApp features.
All information about DecentraCorp and its associated projects can be found in the About section on the dApp. Please feel free to PM me for some ropsten test ether so you can purchase a DecentraCorp Membership which is required to use most features! All Memberships are temporary and WILL NOT carry over to the MainNet Launch.
Any feedback is welcome and appreciated!
The story of DecentraCorp:
A little over a year ago I was working a landscaping job and had very little programming experience. I had been involved in the CryptoSpace since around 2014 and had a small mining operation in a shed in my back yard that I called my lab. Bitcoin had been steadily breaking new all time highs and even the older people I knew where talking about it.
One day in the fall of 2017 I was having a discussion about bitcoin with my neighbor, who was old enough to be my father. While he didn’t know too much about the technical side, he had pointed out that the main problem with my “magic internet money” was that it couldn't easily be used in brick and mortar stores.
While this was a problem I had been aware of (as had most of the crypto community) this had, for whatever reason, gotten me thinking on the problem. At the time I had been playing around with Raspberry Pi’s and the solution I came up with was to use raspberry pi’s to make cryptocurrency Point of Sale machines to sell to local businesses.
I then realized there was the potential to build a business around such a machine. This idea burned in the back of my mind and kept getting better. I soon had another thought that it would be cool if my point of sale machines could somehow be used to mine Cryptocurrency. I started researching existing currencies and when I couldn’t find a suitable one I began designing my own: IdeaCoin.
For the months leading up to December of 2017 I had left the landscaping job and was doing part-time work with a cleaning company. During this time I had also been working on my idea. While working out how IdeaCoin would be mined I designed the CryptoPatent Blockchain the world’s only patent system built around the ideals of Open-Source. It was while I was designing the CryptoPatent Blockchain that DecentraCorp came to be.
In the beginning of this adventure I sought to recruit others to help me build my vision. At one point I had even assembled 4 people who where interested in helping to build the project. During the first day we where able to talk some things out and somewhat refine the idea. The second day everything had come to a screeching halt. One of the people interested in the project had ended up finding another blockchain patent project and shared it with the group. At the time I hadn't even completed the white paper for the project and I pleaded with everyone to give me the night to finish it so I could convince them that the idea was still worth while.
I worked on the white paper the entire day during the downtime at work and into the night. The next morning I happily shared it to the group chat I had set up. Unfortunately I never received a reply from anyone. I spent about a week pouting and dwelling on the subject when I had the realization that no one was going to take me or the project seriously until it was more than just an Idea on paper.
After talking it over with my girlfriend I decided I was going to build it myself. I stopped looking to assemble a dev team and started learning to program. I quit my job so I could work full time on the project and my girlfriend began working full time. We have two young kids together which meant only one of us could work full time. I made a deal with my girlfriend that if I couldn’t make something of my idea within a year that I would abandon the project and go back to supporting our family. She is an amazing woman who I know wouldn’t have held me to it but I set myself a deadline.
Over the last year I have spent every waking moment not spent taking care of my kids or doing side work learning to program and building DecentraCorp. Within the first month I had a working IdeaCoin contract on the test net. By summer I had a working version of the CryptoPatent Blockchain and by fall I was teaching myself React and building the front end interface.
Today I am proud to share the culmination of all that I have learned and done with the ethereum community. While I have yet to build a dev team or community around the project, or secure any type of funding, I feel that I have met the goal set out a year prior. DecentraCorp and the CryptoPatent Blockchain are no longer just ideas on paper. I am now to a point where I am confident in looking for help and funding.
If you have made it this far through my wall of text I hope you can also take the time to poke around https://decentracorp.now.sh and explore what I have built. Any feedback is welcome.
If you find yourself interested in helping out even if you don’t know how, feel free to shoot me a PM here or email at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).

Aside from React and Solidity Devs, I need someone knowledgeable in python as well as someone who knows docker and kubernetes. I am also looking for someone to do PR and someone good at graphic design as well as a legal consultant for the project.

It is my goal for DecentraCorp to radically change the world and I need all the help I can get!
submitted by DecentraCorp to ethdev [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin June Development Update & Release!

Another Quarter, Another Release! The Groestlcoin production factory has been working overtime as always in order to deliver even more tech to push Groestlcoin mainstream when the time comes.
There have been many new fantastic wallets and exchanges added to Groestlcoins repertoire over the past 3 months so we will re-cap these before moving on to what is new today.

Recap

What's New

Re-forged: Groestlcoin Samourai

Groestlcoin Samourai is a wallet for the streets. A modern Groestlcoin wallet hand-forged to keep your transactions private, your identity masked, and your funds secure. Its main advantages are its extreme portability and is the most secure Groestlcoin mobile HD wallet.
We've built a wallet that Groestlcoin deserves. If you are looking for a wallet that Silicon Valley will never build, the regulators will never allow, and the VC's will never invest in, this is the perfect wallet for you.
![Groestlcoin Samourai Release Video](http://img.youtube.com/vi/i3WU8Tde8XQ/0.jpg)

Head over to the Groestlcoin Samourai Release Page here for the full release announcement.

New: GroestlImage

Groestlimage turns any file into a mnemonic phrase allowing users to generate Groestlcoin private keys and addresses based on the data URI of the provided file. A picture is worth a thousand Groestls.

Features:

Link

https://groestlcoin.org/groestlimage/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlimage

New: Groestlcoin Core Config Generator

Groestlcoin Core Config Generator is a simple GUI to configure the groestlcoin.conf file – A developers dream tool!
Each configuration option is available via the user interface, grouped by what attributes they affect. For ease of getting started with a new configuration, a variety of preset "node classes" are available on the right-hand-side of the screen. Selecting a preset will load our recommended base configuration for a node fitting that description, at which point you can then tune the configuration at the single option level.

Features

Link

https://config.groestlcoin.org/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlcoin-core-config-generator

New: Groestlcoin Dumb Block Explorer

Dumb Block Explorer is a trivial block explorer written in a single PHP file. Now everybody can run their own block explorer.

Features

Link

https://www.groestlcoin.org/explore

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/dumb-block-explorer

New: Groestlcoin SMS Push TX

Groestlcoin Simple Push TX is a server to push Groestlcoin transactions via SMS. Now everybody can send new transactions via SMS if the Internet is not usable (i.e. blocked by government entities or becomes otherwise unavailable).

Features

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/smspushtx

Update: Electrum-GRS 3.3.6

Electrum-GRS is Groestlcoins #1 thin-client for Windows, MacOS, Linux and Android, based on a client-server protocol. Supporting multi-sig wallets without the bloat of downloading the entire blockchain.

New Features (Universal)

New Features (Windows, MacOS, Linux)

New Features (Android)

Link

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/download
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.groestlcoin.electrumgrs

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoineum: Virtual mining on Ethereum

Hi Guys,
I'm officially announcing that I have started mining Bitcoineum on the Ethereum network as of 4:00 am EST July 19, 2017, and anyone is free to join me. This is a fair mined, no founder's reward, no premine, no hidden shenanigans token. I was going to make this public announcement even earlier but due to scheduled travel I wanted to make sure I was available to answer questions if there were any.
Bitcoineum attempts to duplicate the value preserving aspect of Bitcoin and bake it into the Ethereum network as an ERC20 Token while employing a completely novel virtual mining system. Think of it as a modular base token that abstracts the mining, and has functionality for converting into other types of tokens and systems as the ERC20 infrastructure evolves. A transferrable proof-of-burn that is designed to bootstrap a value store right onto the Ethereum smart contract network. A simpler and more straight forward approach than trying to attach a separate smart contract network to your value store, such as what is happening in Bitcoin right now.
Further, anyone who has Ether can mine Bitcoineum from a web interface right now without any special hardware. That means device independent mining, mobile phones, the web, embedded, raspberry pi, whatever. I wanted to create a fair, equitable, distributed and accessible mining system that can drive value into other tokens. The example web miner works but is very bare bones, and needs further improvement but anyone can build a miner that interfaces with the smart contract. I can imagine a very sleek front end built around it to start, but the actual mining algorithm can be tweaked to try and optimize returns. A little bonus for the people interested in algorithmic trading. I am also actively working on a mining pool contract that will aggregate multiple users which will both increase the likelihood of mining the block, and proportionally increase the reward. The idea that other contracts will drive mining in the future is central to Bitcoineum. The possibilities behind that are very interesting and could help create actual on chain financial products.
You can read more about it, including motivations, technical white paper, and other general information at: http://www.bitcoineum.com/
You can check out the Solidity smart contract code, testing harnesses, and miner frontend at http://www.gitlab.com/mbrix/bitcoineum Pull requests gladly accepted. If you have the chops to security audit the contract code I'd be glad to hear your feedback.
You can start mining directly with a locally unlocked Geth/Parity node, and the web miner at http://www.bitcoineum.com/mine It is web console based, and tested mostly on Chrome. The one feature that is worth noting is that you can set the credit account to a cold wallet address, so you can limit the funds the miner has access to in your unlocked geth instance and still securely deliver any mining rewards to cold storage directly. I recommend doing this to limit any potential loss of funds due to bugs, misconfiguration, etc. I don't want to get reports back that someone lost a million ether on their unlocked instance because of a hack or a silly bug. Keep the accessible miner account limited, and verify the contract address on the transactions being done.
If you are concerned about the integrity of the web site for some reason (it is completely statically served on S3) you can run the miner directly from the git repo, although that's a bit outside of the scope of this post.
It is also possible to mine using MetaMask, but without being able to unlock your wallet it is extremely tedious. Once this is addressed upstream it will not be necessary to run a local node to mine Bitcoineum, really easy decentralized mining. Currently I disable metamask/parity chrome client when mining since they tend to interfere.
The contract address is 0x73dd069c299a5d691e9836243bcaec9c8c1d8734
Finally, a quick word about proof-of-burn. There was a rigorous debate about it's merits last time I released a token for registering Lost ether. I am a strong proponent of proof-of-burn as a substitute for proof-of-work, but I am cognizant of the argument that there must be a reason to exist beyond simply store-of-value, deflationary, fixed cap semantics. Although, I believe that Bitcoineum's structure is useful and complementary to inflationary Ether, I've taken it one important step further. I think there are several things about an ERC20 token that we are only beginning to explore. You can think of it as an atom in a larger structure, a building block towards more sophisticated capabilities. Bitcoineum's user-oriented mining and value semantics are meant to serve as a base token for a wide range of other applications. I've built a simple but effective interface into the token called Transmutable. This let's one Bitcoineum seamlessly turn into other ERC20 tokens that have yet to be created. The value burned to create Bitcoineum can than transfer directly into these other types of tokens in a standardized way. A a tangible example users could migrate value into a successor ZkSnark Bitcoineum token once that functionality makes it into Etheruem. So the value store itself can directly be used as an input into more advanced tokens. This is both new and novel functionality, that when combined with it's other properties makes it a worthy thing to mine. Please join me :D.
I'll be around for a little while to answer questions, but I'm also on the road the next few weeks, so if I'm slow to respond to pull requests for the awesome new miner your wrote please be patient. You can email me at [email protected], reach me here on Reddit, or come at me on twitter @brantonbits. Despite the testing and work I've put into it this is still a beta product, so you mine at your own risk. I'm hoping this makes a useful addition to the Ethereum ecosystem, and chips away at the idea that Bitcoin can survive simply as a store-of-value when developers can create these types of systems right on Ethereum.
submitted by coinlock to ethereum [link] [comments]

Staking Nebilo - How To Guide!

Hey! I’m relatively new to Cryptos and the dark arts of how it ‘really’ works – I got into it because I heard that a friend of a friend had bought $13,000 worth of XRP at $0.30 and sold it all at pretty much the all time high. Naturally you could forgive me for thinking that this is easy!
Since then I’ve tried trading and to be totally honest, it doesn’t play to my strengths. I’m at my best when I find an opportunity and hold (I make no apologies for spelling that correctly either!). I’ve only come across 3-4 coins that have caught my attention so far and I’ve been through nearly all of them in the top 300 and a lot of them outside of that (as well as multiple ICO’s).
Now you know a little bit about my background and how I got into Cryptos – the purpose of this post is to help all the NEBL holders/owners out there understand that by leaving your NEBL in an online exchanges such as Binance you are letting them earn interest on your investment! Nebilo is a Proof of Stake (PoS) coin and PoS is a category of consensus algorithms for public blockchains, which Neblio’s algorithm is a part of. It serves a similar function to the proof of work which underpins the security behind Bitcoin, but has significant advantages in terms of security and energy efficiency.
There are multiple links that I used to get me set up, as well as some really useful help from Telegram user ‘rejoin**’ The only problem was that to someone who has completely no idea about how to use anything other than Microsoft Excel, Word or Powerpoint – answers like ‘it’s simple’ weren’t really what I was looking for.
Cutting to the chase – here is a full guide to help people with ‘staking’ https://nebl.io/2017/07/01/staking-explained/ for the Raspberry Pi 3 – it should however help anyone looking to stake as the basic principles are the same across the board.
Step 1 - Buy the Pi
Assuming that you’re here because you’ve already bought NEBL – the first thing that you need to do is decide what device you want to stake on. Personally I went for the Raspberry Pi 3 (RP3) – it’s low energy consumption and it was as simple as that for me. I bought mine on Amazon for around £45 - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Raspberry-Pi-Official-Desktop-Startedp/B01CI58722/ref=sr_1_5?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1517059342&sr=1-5&keywords=raspberry%2Bpi%2B3&th=1
Step 2 - Setting up the Pi
The lovely postman turns up and hands you your package – opening it is quite an experience in itself, there is virtually nothing there, apart from a circuit board, power cable and a few bits of plastic. Prepare to be amazed! To get set up – the best work through I found is this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbJB3387xUw
Apologies in advance, but that isn’t Donald Trump. Looks pretty close though.
Step 3 - Download the wallet
There are lots of wallets to choose from - https://nebl.io/wallets/ - but for the sake of this how to guide – make sure you go on your RP3 and download the RP3 wallet.
You can either copy the script from the webpage – or this post. You will need to click on the ‘Terminal’ on the RP3 – paste this exactly into the terminal and it will start to install the wallet. The terminal can be found pinned to the taskbar on the RP3 - it looks a bit like the 'run' feature on Windows.
'curl https://raw.githubusercontent.com/NeblioTeam/NEBL-Pi/masteNEBL-Pi-Installer.sh | bash -s -- -q'
I don’t know about you – but I was already pretty amazed at this point (doesn’t take a lot… I know).
Step 4 - Syncing
Once you’ve done the step 3, you should be presented with a neblio wallet on your RP3 desktop. We’ll leave that bit there for now – it will need start to sync and you’ll see a certain number of blocks processing etc, so now we need to concentrate on getting yourself set up with a firewall and making sure your RP3 doesn’t power down (if it does, then your node will not count at active and staking will not be live).
Step 5 – Encrypt your wallet
This is a very important part of the process – to stake, your wallet must be unlocked, but encrypted – make sure you take the time here to set a complex password that only you know. To encrypt your wallet – click on ‘settings’ and then ‘encrypt wallet’.
Step 6 – Downloading a firewall
Now you’re welcome to google this (I did when it was explained to me), so once you have – go to your terminal again and type in the following one after another.
sudo apt-get install ufw –y (copy, paste and then press enter)
sudo ufw enable (let it run, copy, paste and then press enter)
sudo ufw allow 6325 (let it run, copy, paste and then press enter)
Step 7 – Setting your RP3 to stay awake (Optional - I did this purely for peace of mind)
There might well be a better way of doing this and if there is, please let me know and I’ll update this post… but this was the best video I found for this was here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWKSTsWwOTk
I went into the feature that you install and set all the minutes to the highest possible values (which I believe are 720 minutes).
Step 8 – Send your NEBL’s
Now that you have your wallet set up with firewall and the RP3 won’t sleep – It’s time to get move your NEBL’s from Binance or whatever other exchange you’re using. Click on ‘receive tokens’ and you’ll be presented with your wallet address. I always send 1 token first to test the route works – yeah you get charged 0.01 NEBL, but for me I prefer the safety route first.
The only thing to note is that it is best to stake in as higher group as possible. If for example you have 1000 NEBL and you transferred them across in 4 batches of 250 – you would have 4 staking groups of 250 each.
If you’re OK with sending them to yourself in one go, then go for it and we’re nearly there!
Step 9 – Unlock your wallet
In order to stake, you must have your wallet open – this allows you to become part of the blockchain and act as a node in the wider Neblio network. Through being open you process the transactions through the network and earn fees.
Step 10 – Wait and earn!
Now that you’ve got all your NEBL’s in your wallet and it is unlocked and encrypted (please make sure you’ve done this!!) it will take 24 hours at least for your coins to mature, you will see a stack of coins in the bottom right hand corner, when these are white it means they are not currently staking. As soon as these have changed to black, it will tell you your weight and how many days until you get your reward for supporting the Neblio Blockchain!
If anyone found this step by step guide of any use – Any donations gratefully received! Oh... and please backup your wallet! There are guides for this when you download the wallet.
NEBL - Nex9xcgNcmjPKBp9LA85cpmS44tJewsFp2
Further help can be found in the Neblio Telegram Group - https://t.me/joinchat/GFVgz0G-oVXOIJGfFYD-vg
submitted by danjel888 to Neblio [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining For 24 Hours! - YouTube Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi, Butterfly Labs Miner and ... How to image a Raspberry Pi with Minera for USB Bitcoin Mining Raspberry Pi Bitcoin mining ( Monero XMR Coin ) PART1 ... Working USB Bitcoin Farm with Raspberry Pi running Minera

Following on from mining cryptocurrency using a Raspberry Pi, you can also use the device to stake cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies that use Proof of Stake (PoS) algorithms instead of energy-intensive Proof of Work (PoW) algorithms bring the power back to end-users rather than the enormous mining pools. The beauty of using a Raspberry Pi for staking is the low energy cost. You can leave a ... I'm planning to buy a Raspberry Pi 3 for personal use. I wanted to use the device to mine BitCoins/LiteCoins. I am currently residing in dorms at college, so power consumption is not an issue. What I'm wondering is if it is worth it to mine on a Raspberry Pi 3 at college? If not, I could always do other projects with it. I can't find any good ... Now you're ready to set your Raspberry Pi mining for Bitcoin. Add Tip Ask Question Comment Download. Step 4: Setting Up the Raspberry Pi. Start with a fresh Raspbian install, if you don’t know who to do this, read the tutorial How to Install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi With a Mac. If you plan on running more than one Bitcoin miner at the same time, it is best to use a powered USB hub. Take into ... Auto Script for Mining on Rasbperry Pi 3. If you are lazy you can use this MinerSetup.sh which is a bash file to perform all the above steps automatically. if you are even more lazy you can simply download minerd-multi and run "./minerd-multi --help" Hope you have fun mining on your Raspberry Pi 3 Is Bitcoin mining with Raspberry Pi worth while? I saw someone else's post today about how. It got me curious: is it worth while to use the RasPi for bit mining when I'm not playing? For those that do, approximately how much do you make? Which ASIC are you using and would you recommend it? Thanks. 4 comments. share . save hide report. 63% Upvoted. This thread is archived. New comments cannot ...

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Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining For 24 Hours! - YouTube

This is an overview of how I mine Bitcoins using a mining device from Butterfly Labs, a Raspberry Pi to control it, and MinePeon software to mine and connect... Buy Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 4GB: https://amzn.to/2tlBfGW How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g... Link to this course(special discount) https://www.udemy.com/course/bitcoin-mining-using-raspberry-pi/?ranMID=39197&ranEAID=Gw%2FETjJoU9M&ranSiteID=Gw_ETjJoU9... Complete end product of this video series- A Raspberry Pi imaged with Minera, running GekkoScience Compac and 2Pac USB sticks. Here are the links for the programs- Zipeg- http://www.zipeg.com/ Win32 Disk Imager- https://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ Advanced IP Scanner- h...

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