Tutorial: Carteira Bitcoin Multisig com Electrum Wallet ...

I made a tutorial for setting up multisig using Unchained Capital's open source Caravan alongside a few Ledger devices. TLDW: More user friendly than doing the same Electrum, less versatility with wallet choices for now. Beware user error, connect node for extra privacy. (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

I made a tutorial for setting up multisig using Unchained Capital's open source Caravan alongside a few Ledger devices. TLDW: More user friendly than doing the same Electrum, less versatility with wallet choices for now. Beware user error, connect node for extra privacy. (x-post from /Bitcoin) submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

Tutorial: Coinkite Multisig Vault with Bitcoin Armory Lockbox [video]

Tutorial: Coinkite Multisig Vault with Bitcoin Armory Lockbox [video] submitted by rnvk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tutorial for Multisig accounts between HW wallets? /r/Bitcoin

Tutorial for Multisig accounts between HW wallets? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Discussion • My short multisig tutorial using Copay

submitted by btcforumbot to BtcForum [link] [comments]

Does a tutorial exist to create an encrypted multisig paperwork manually? /r/Bitcoin

Does a tutorial exist to create an encrypted multisig paperwork manually? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Summary of Tau-Chain Monthly Video Update - July 2020

Karim
Agoras Live: Five functionalities complete: 1. Registration 2. Login 3. User Profile Page 4. Calendar 5. Categories List 6. Wallet Screen Payments: Decided that implementing lightning would be too complex. Instead, we decided to implement our own micropayment mechanism using the native BTC multisig addresses. We are going to use the Omni wallet for payments. TML: Continued debugging, getting a TML demo and test cases ready. Hiring: More hiring efforts to increase team size. Timelines: Committing ourselves to a release of Agoras Live and a basic version of discussions in TML in 2020.
Umar: Been working on making improvements to the context free grammar parsing. We now are able to add constraints to productions in the grammar, allowing us to recognize grammars that are context sensitive. Developed test cases for that, too.
Tomas: Fixed issues in TML and ran several steps in a TML program. Now adding more tests to make sure everything is stable and won’t break. Also been working on a TML tutorial, a recorded script based on the intro to TML which was contained in the TML Playground. Also new features are going to be covered such as arithmetics.
Kilian: More outreach & follow-ups to potential partner universities. Positive response by a professor based in Toronto, presented to him our project. Also, response by KULeuven, Belgium, who unfortunately don’t see a good fit in our project. We’ve had one applicant for the IDNI Grant program and currently are evaluating his proposal. Also, we’ve had an applicant from Bangalore, India for the IDNI Ambassador program and we also have been discussing his proposal. Translation Bounties: We’ve had the blog post “The New Tau” translated to Chinese and have been reviewing the translation. We are going to publish the translation on our website and on the Bitcointalk Chinese forum section. Still to be claimed: German translation of “The New Tau”. Done more effort on reach out to potential tribe channels: Research groups, LinkedIn groups, Facebook groups. Most represented keywords: Complex Adaptive Systems, NLP, Computational Linguistics. Usual feedback: Likes but no further interaction. Created an FAQ answering all possible questions surrounding IDNI, Tau & Agoras Idea: Hosting a virtual panel to spread the word about our project among the scientific community, as well as to create some visual content for our community. Two professors are interested in participating, one from Argentina with a focus in semantic parsing, the other one from the University of Washington with a focus on human-computer interaction and social computing. First step: organizing a pre-panel discussion where in 1on1 calls with the professors we get an opinion of them about what we are doing.
Andrei: Agoras Live: Implemented mail system so users now get their mails (e.g. registration email). Improved UX together with Mo’az, e.g. user profiles. Token creation for accessing calls to identify and charge users. Customized Jitsi interface to suit our needs: E.g. display of how much time passed in a call and how much it costs. Next up: Further improve UX; make sure everything works as intended.
Mo’az: Almost finished the IDNI website. Added two more pages: Events & Bounties in collaboration with Fola & Kilian. Agoras Live: Finetuned all the website’s components in collaboration with Andrei.
Juan: Continued working on the payments system for Agoras Live. Had some delays due to the complexity of debugging such applications. Still, we made significant progress and got the funding transactions implemented over the Lightning network through the Omni layer. Spent time analyzing the minimum amount of BTC to pay for the fees associated to the Omni transactions. We aren’t using segregated witness native addresses and instead are using embedded segregated witness. So transaction sizes are enlarged and transaction fees are a bit higher. So there is a bit of finetuning analysis needed in order to enable the multisig address to pay for the closing & refund transactions. So to provide payment channels over the Omni layer, the main remaining technical detail we have to solve at this point is the closing transaction & the refund transaction.
Fola: Have been continuing to look for great talent in different areas. Continued working on website with Mo’az and Kilian. Been working on the branding for Tau & Agoras. Been getting external support to make sure the branding for Tau & Agoras will be as professional as it can be. Working on marketing efforts needed for the release of Agoras Live to get the media pack for marketing ready. Working together with external people to put a plan together for listing the Agoras token on more prominent exchanges as we get closer to release of Agoras Live.
Ohad: Continued working on restricted versions of second-order logic to understand how to implement them. There is a translation in the literature about how to convert second-order logic by Horn into Datalog. Also, I have been revisiting papers that deal with descriptive complexity of higher-order logic. They mention that they have a translation from second-order logic to QBF. I wasn’t able to find where they explain this translation but I wrote one of them and he said he will send me the paper. If so, that will be very good because we already have a QBF solver. Any binary decision diagram is already a QBF solver, so we can just translate arbitrary second-order logic formulas into QBF. This will be very helpful for us to implement second-order logic. Also, those papers mention several aspects that are relevant for self-interpretation, the laws of laws. Apparently, they suggest that certain fragments of higher-order logic may also support the laws of laws. But this is part of the papers that I didn’t have access to, so I have to wait to get further clarification. I also pushed the whitepaper significantly this month and hope we will be finishing it soon. Also, I was thinking about some optimizations for the parser and also was looking into the Lightning network. It was my mistake that I haven’t done so beforehand and if I had done it beforehand, I would have understood earlier, that Lightning is too much. It is too drastic of a change to how traditional payments work and there apparently is no reason to believe that it is secure. So I’m glad I discovered better now than later that it’s not something we’d like to rely on, although we can have it as an optional feature.
Q&A:
Q: With the project development taking longer than other projects such as Tezos, when can AGRS holders expect something to be released and, how can you reassure us that we made the right decision?
A: With regards to when we see some releases, it seems that we will see some releases in 2020. For comparing to Ethereum and Tezos: Let’s first talk about funding. Both projects had a lot of money. For Ethereum, the reason for is that it has probably done one of the most aggressive marketing campaigns in history. It was completely lacking any kind of honesty. It was simply aggressive. None of Ethereum’s visions and promises became true. It simply became an insecure platform for scams. None of their vision of creating a world computer, of creating a better society, a better currency, became true. Because of this aggressive marketing, they not only raised a lot of money, they also took the price to be so high in the market. If you remember the campaign of the flipping, they did a whole campaign on how they would overtake the marketcap of Bitcoin. For Tezos, they made maybe the largest ICO in history in terms of money, mainly because they came at the right time, at the top of the bubble in 2017, and also their promises for better coordination didn’t come true. Their solution is based on voting and based on Turing completeness and the only reason why they managed to gain such a market cap as of today, is not because they offer better currency, better society, better anything. It basically is a Ponzi-scheme because they offer very high interest rate by very high inflation (5,51%). The only reason why people buy Tezos is to get into this Ponzi-scheme. Because both Tezos and Ethereum lack any true economical or technological substance, their value will not sustain and this is true for almost all projects in the cryptocurrency world. In the software, high-tech market, if you come up with good tech and you do all the right things, you succeed big time. But if you don’t have it and you are purely relying on brainwashing people, it will not sustain. Of course, our solution is so disruptive and sustainable. We offer to do advancements for humanity and for economy.
Q: What three subjects would you first like to see discussed on Tau?
A: Of course, picking three subjects now is a bit speculative, but the first thing that comes to mind is the definitions of what good and bad means and what better and worse means. The second subject is the governance model over Tau. The third one is the specification of Tau itself and how to make it grow and evolve even more to suit wider audiences. The whole point of Tau is people collaborating in order to define Tau itself and to improve it over time, so it will improve up to infinity. This is the main thing, especially initially, that the Tau developers (or rather users) advance the platform more and more.
Q: What is stopping programmers using TML right now? If nothing, what is your opinion on why they aren’t?
A: There is nothing essentially missing in TML in order to let it release. And in fact, we are now working towards packaging it and bringing it towards a release level. For things like documentation, bug fixes, minor features, minor optimizations. We indeed actively work towards releasing TML 1.0 and then we can publish it in e.g. developers channels for them to use it.
submitted by m4nki to tauchain [link] [comments]

Multisig Escrow Bitcoin Transaction

Hi,
So in order to make a bitcoin transaction, there is this multisig escrow transaction that you have to perform... I'm not familiar with bitcoin technology or multisig / escrow at all... anywhere I can go for step by step tutorials on how to establish and make this kind of transaction?
Thanks,
submitted by halfstep007 to darknet [link] [comments]

⚡ Lightning Network Megathread ⚡

Last updated 2018-01-29
This post is a collaboration with the Bitcoin community to create a one-stop source for Lightning Network information.
There are still questions in the FAQ that are unanswered, if you know the answer and can provide a source please do so!

⚡What is the Lightning Network? ⚡

Explanations:

Image Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

  • starkbot - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • cfromknecht - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • RustyReddit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • cdecker - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • Dryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • josephpoon - (Joseph Poon)
  • fdrn - (Fabrice Drouin - ACINQ )
  • pmpadiou - (Pierre-Marie Padiou - ACINQ)

Lightning Network Experts on Twitter

  • @starkness - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • @roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • @stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • @bitconner - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • @johanth - (Johan Halseth - Lightning Labs)
  • @bvu - (Bryan Vu - Lightning Labs)
  • @rusty_twit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • @snyke - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • @JackMallers - (Jack Mallers - Zap)
  • @tdryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • @jcp - (Joseph Poon)
  • @alexbosworth - (Alex Bosworth - yalls.org)

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallets

Place a testnet transaction

Altcoin Trading using Lightning

  • ZigZag - Disclaimer You must trust ZigZag to send to Target Address

Lightning on Mainnet

Warning - Testing should be done on Testnet

Atomic Swaps

Developer Documentation and Resources

Lightning implementations

  • LND - Lightning Network Daemon (Golang)
  • eclair - A Scala implementation of the Lightning Network (Scala)
  • c-lightning - A Lightning Network implementation in C
  • lit - Lightning Network node software (Golang)
  • lightning-onion - Onion Routed Micropayments for the Lightning Network (Golang)
  • lightning-integration - Lightning Integration Testing Framework
  • ptarmigan - C++ BOLT-Compliant Lightning Network Implementation [Incomplete]

Libraries

Lightning Network Visualizers/Explorers

Testnet

Mainnet

Payment Processors

  • BTCPay - Next stable version will include Lightning Network

Community

Slack

IRC

Slack Channel

Discord Channel

Miscellaneous

⚡ Lightning FAQs ⚡

If you can answer please PM me and include source if possible. Feel free to help keep these answers up to date and as brief but correct as possible
Is Lightning Bitcoin?
Yes. You pick a peer and after some setup, create a bitcoin transaction to fund the lightning channel; it’ll then take another transaction to close it and release your funds. You and your peer always hold a bitcoin transaction to get your funds whenever you want: just broadcast to the blockchain like normal. In other words, you and your peer create a shared account, and then use Lightning to securely negotiate who gets how much from that shared account, without waiting for the bitcoin blockchain.
Is the Lightning Network open source?
Yes, Lightning is open source. Anyone can review the code (in the same way as the bitcoin code)
Who owns and controls the Lightning Network?
Similar to the bitcoin network, no one will ever own or control the Lightning Network. The code is open source and free for anyone to download and review. Anyone can run a node and be part of the network.
I’ve heard that Lightning transactions are happening “off-chain”…Does that mean that my bitcoin will be removed from the blockchain?
No, your bitcoin will never leave the blockchain. Instead your bitcoin will be held in a multi-signature address as long as your channel stays open. When the channel is closed; the final transaction will be added to the blockchain. “Off-chain” is not a perfect term, but it is used due to the fact that the transfer of ownership is no longer reflected on the blockchain until the channel is closed.
Do I need a constant connection to run a lightning node?
Not necessarily,
Example: A and B have a channel. 1 BTC each. A sends B 0.5 BTC. B sends back 0.25 BTC. Balance should be A = 0.75, B = 1.25. If A gets disconnected, B can publish the first Tx where the balance was A = 0.5 and B = 1.5. If the node B does in fact attempt to cheat by publishing an old state (such as the A=0.5 and B=1.5 state), this cheat can then be detected on-chain and used to steal the cheaters funds, i.e., A can see the closing transaction, notice it's an old one and grab all funds in the channel (A=2, B=0). The time that A has in order to react to the cheating counterparty is given by the CheckLockTimeVerify (CLTV) in the cheating transaction, which is adjustable. So if A foresees that it'll be able to check in about once every 24 hours it'll require that the CLTV is at least that large, if it's once a week then that's fine too. You definitely do not need to be online and watching the chain 24/7, just make sure to check in once in a while before the CLTV expires. Alternatively you can outsource the watch duties, in order to keep the CLTV timeouts low. This can be achieved both with trusted third parties or untrusted ones (watchtowers). In the case of a unilateral close, e.g., you just go offline and never come back, the other endpoint will have to wait for that timeout to expire to get its funds back. So peers might not accept channels with extremely high CLTV timeouts. -- Source
What Are Lightning’s Advantages?
Tiny payments are possible: since fees are proportional to the payment amount, you can pay a fraction of a cent; accounting is even done in thousandths of a satoshi. Payments are settled instantly: the money is sent in the time it takes to cross the network to your destination and back, typically a fraction of a second.
Does Lightning require Segregated Witness?
Yes, but not in theory. You could make a poorer lightning network without it, which has higher risks when establishing channels (you might have to wait a month if things go wrong!), has limited channel lifetime, longer minimum payment expiry times on each hop, is less efficient and has less robust outsourcing. The entire spec as written today assumes segregated witness, as it solves all these problems.
Can I Send Funds From Lightning to a Normal Bitcoin Address?
No, for now. For the first version of the protocol, if you wanted to send a normal bitcoin transaction using your channel, you have to close it, send the funds, then reopen the channel (3 transactions). In future versions, you and your peer would agree to spend out of your lightning channel funds just like a normal bitcoin payment, allowing you to use your lightning wallet like a normal bitcoin wallet.
Can I Make Money Running a Lightning Node?
Not really. Anyone can set up a node, and so it’s a race to the bottom on fees. In practice, we may see the network use a nominal fee and not change very much, which only provides an incremental incentive to route on a node you’re going to use yourself, and not enough to run one merely for fees. Having clients use criteria other than fees (e.g. randomness, diversity) in route selection will also help this.
What is the release date for Lightning on Mainnet?
Lightning is already being tested on the Mainnet Twitter Link but as for a specific date, Jameson Lopp says it best
Would there be any KYC/AML issues with certain nodes?
Nope, because there is no custody ever involved. It's just like forwarding packets. -- Source
What is the delay time for the recipient of a transaction receiving confirmation?
Furthermore, the Lightning Network scales not with the transaction throughput of the underlying blockchain, but with modern data processing and latency limits - payments can be made nearly as quickly as packets can be sent. -- Source
How does the lightning network prevent centralization?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
What are Channel Factories and how do they work?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How does the Lightning network work in simple terms?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How are paths found in Lightning Network?
Bitcoin Stack Exchange Answer
How would the lightning network work between exchanges?
Each exchange will get to decide and need to implement the software into their system, but some ideas have been outlined here: Google Doc - Lightning Exchanges
Note that by virtue of the usual benefits of cost-less, instantaneous transactions, lightning will make arbitrage between exchanges much more efficient and thus lead to consistent pricing across exchange that adopt it. -- Source
How do lightning nodes find other lightning nodes?
Stack Exchange Answer
Does every user need to store the state of the complete Lightning Network?
According to Rusty's calculations we should be able to store 1 million nodes in about 100 MB, so that should work even for mobile phones. Beyond that we have some proposals ready to lighten the load on endpoints, but we'll cross that bridge when we get there. -- Source
Would I need to download the complete state every time I open the App and make a payment?
No you'd remember the information from the last time you started the app and only sync the differences. This is not yet implemented, but it shouldn't be too hard to get a preliminary protocol working if that turns out to be a problem. -- Source
What needs to happen for the Lightning Network to be deployed and what can I do as a user to help?
Lightning is based on participants in the network running lightning node software that enables them to interact with other nodes. This does not require being a full bitcoin node, but you will have to run "lnd", "eclair", or one of the other node softwares listed above.
All lightning wallets have node software integrated into them, because that is necessary to create payment channels and conduct payments on the network, but you can also intentionally run lnd or similar for public benefit - e.g. you can hold open payment channels or channels with higher volume, than you need for your own transactions. You would be compensated in modest fees by those who transact across your node with multi-hop payments. -- Source
Is there anyway for someone who isn't a developer to meaningfully contribute?
Sure, you can help write up educational material. You can learn and read more about the tech at http://dev.lightning.community/resources. You can test the various desktop and mobile apps out there (Lightning Desktop, Zap, Eclair apps). -- Source
Do I need to be a miner to be a Lightning Network node?
No -- Source
Do I need to run a full Bitcoin node to run a lightning node?
lit doesn't depend on having your own full node -- it automatically connects to full nodes on the network. -- Source
LND uses a light client mode, so it doesn't require a full node. The name of the light client it uses is called neutrino
How does the lightning network stop "Cheating" (Someone broadcasting an old transaction)?
Upon opening a channel, the two endpoints first agree on a reserve value, below which the channel balance may not drop. This is to make sure that both endpoints always have some skin in the game as rustyreddit puts it :-)
For a cheat to become worth it, the opponent has to be absolutely sure that you cannot retaliate against him during the timeout. So he has to make sure you never ever get network connectivity during that time. Having someone else also watching for channel closures and notifying you, or releasing a canned retaliation, makes this even harder for the attacker. This is because if he misjudged you being truly offline you can retaliate by grabbing all of its funds. Spotty connections, DDoS, and similar will not provide the attacker the necessary guarantees to make cheating worthwhile. Any form of uncertainty about your online status acts as a deterrent to the other endpoint. -- Source
How many times would someone need to open and close their lightning channels?
You typically want to have more than one channel open at any given time for redundancy's sake. And we imagine open and close will probably be automated for the most part. In fact we already have a feature in LND called autopilot that can automatically open channels for a user.
Frequency will depend whether the funds are needed on-chain or more useful on LN. -- Source
Will the lightning network reduce BTC Liquidity due to "locking-up" funds in channels?
Stack Exchange Answer
Can the Lightning Network work on any other cryptocurrency? How?
Stack Exchange Answer
When setting up a Lightning Network Node are fees set for the entire node, or each channel when opened?
You don't really set up a "node" in the sense that anyone with more than one channel can automatically be a node and route payments. Fees on LN can be set by the node, and can change dynamically on the network. -- Source
Can Lightning routing fees be changed dynamically, without closing channels?
Yes but it has to be implemented in the Lightning software being used. -- Source
How can you make sure that there will be routes with large enough balances to handle transactions?
You won't have to do anything. With autopilot enabled, it'll automatically open and close channels based on the availability of the network. -- Source
How does the Lightning Network stop flooding nodes (DDoS) with micro transactions? Is this even an issue?
Stack Exchange Answer

Unanswered Questions

How do on-chain fees work when opening and closing channels? Who pays the fee?
How does the Lightning Network work for mobile users?
What are the best practices for securing a lightning node?
What is a lightning "hub"?
How does lightning handle cross chain (Atomic) swaps?

Special Thanks and Notes

  • Many links found from awesome-lightning-network github
  • Everyone who submitted a question or concern!
  • I'm continuing to format for an easier Mobile experience!
submitted by codedaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

An in-depth overview of different mobile wallets

Disclaimer: A lot of time went into writing this and more research than I anticipated. Errors are not just possible, they are certain. If you find any mistakes, please reach out to me and I'll edit. Furthermore I know I probably missed a couple apps, there are a lot out there. If I missed a big one, then again contact me and I'll consider adding it. If you are reading this in the future, note that these apps update regularly, anything mentioned here may have changed by the time you are reading it.

What is a mobile wallet?

A mobile Bitcoin wallet is an application for a mobile device which acts as a lightweight wallet and allows you to store, send and receive Bitcoin (or other cryptocurrencies and tokens). Mobile wallets use SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) to allow wallet functionality without having to download the whole blockchain. This is very important as barely any mobile phones have enough storage space required for the full blockchain. Mobile wallets are also considered hotwallets, meaning they have an active connection to the internet. The mere fact of being 'online' allows for a number of attack vectors and as such should never be used to store large amounts. It is however not unsafe per se. Private keys are stored locally and encrypted. Some wallets keep backups of those encrypted private keys on a server of their own, and this is something to take note of, but not to fear. So without further ado, lets get to it. I focused on Android wallets, but many of the wallets mentioned here have iOS versions.

Quick overview

Name Segwit Multisig Backup Other coins Fee Choice Privacy Options Depth/Complexity
Samourai Yes No 12 word seed + passphrase No Custom A ton Advanced
Bread No No 12 word seed No 2 Options No Beginner
GreenAddress Yes Yes 24 word seed No Custom Tor Optional Intermediate
AirBitz No No Private seed No Custom-ish No Beginner
Electrum Yes Yes 12 word seed No Custom Proxy possible Intermediate
Copay No Yes 12 word seed No Custom No Beginner
ArcBit No No 12 word seed No Fixed or Dynamic No Beginner
CoinSpace No No 12 word seed BCH/LTC/ETH 3 Options No Intermediate
Simple Bitcoin No No 12 word seed No None No Beginner
Bither No No 12 word seed BCH/BCG 4 choices No Intermediate
GreenBits Yes No 24 word seed No Custom No Beginner
Jaxx No No 12 word seed A ton 3 options No Advanced
Xapo / / / / / Public /
Coinomi No No 18 word seed A ton Custom No Advanced
Mycelium No No 12 word seed No Scrollwheel Tor Optional Intermediate

Wallet Breakdown

Samourai

Samourai focusses heavily on anonymity and obfuscation. Addresses are never used more than once. When making a transaction there is an obfuscation slider. Samourai has had SegWit enabled since October. Furthermore it offers a plethora of different features, too much to sum up here. If you are an advanced crypto-user you should definitely check out this wallet and their website which explains all of the different features. The UI takes a bit of getting used to though.

Breadwallet

Breadwallet is a very simple to use, straightforward app. The UI is slick and intuitive and in-app support to basic questions is very well incorporated. This could be a good wallet for a new person to the scene. The lack of advanced features will make this app not the go-to for more experienced users. It does however feature fingerprint authentication, which is cool, as well as BCH extraction. The lack of SegWit and complete absence of custom fee's is a problem though, especially since fees have gone up during the recent BTC spike. With only 2 fee options to choose from I simply can not recommend this wallet to people who are looking to make frequent transactions.

GreenAddress

When I first started with Greenaddress I didn't like the UI, I found it a bit clumsy. So definitely not user-friendly for a beginner. On the plus side it allows a choice of 2FA settings. Furthermore it has SegWit enabled and it has some advanced features like nLockTime transactions and it offers a service for instant transactions. This all feels very Lightning Network-y, which makes sense as GreenAddress is a part of Blockstream. Our friends in the other sub will most likely have something to say about this. I'll refrain from this and just say the following: this is an advanced wallet with promising features. If they clean up their UI a bit I could see myself using this without hesitation. The fact that they have MultiSig is a big plus as most mobile wallets do not have this functionality.

AirBitz

Unlike any other wallet I fired up at that point, this app did not prompt me with a 12- or 24-word seed. Instead it made me make an account, the regular username/password combo. After some research I found that these are not stored in a local database on their end. Which means that recovering your password in case of loss like with every other username/password login method we are so used to, is not possible. It is merely a different representation of an encryption key, allowing you access to your private keys. It features some interesting stuff though, NFC-compliant transactions and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for example. Clearly this app is meant to be a bridge between users and merchants and has focus on making regular in-person transactions. Thus it mimics some non-crypto related payment apps that we have. Personally, I am not a fan, but I can appreciate the design philosophy and I would't be surprised if their design model worked very well in the future with the LN or with other crypto's that focus on small payments. As for the UI, it's fairly simple, yet horribly cluttered with partnered services. Good for non-techies maybe, but not for more experienced crypto-enthusiasts.

Electrum

Much like the desktop wallet I used years ago when I first started with Bitcoin, the mobile wallet is minimal. Straightforward and without fancy colors or UI. For those of us who have known the internet before Facebook, this app will feel strangely familiar. This is a classic example of a no-nonsense wallet with the features that really matter. SegWit and MultiSig enabled. A further lack of advanced options might be a turn-off for some users out there though. I did however find the option to spend coins from unconfirmed transactions. This could be very useful in case you want to cancel out a previously stuck or erroneous transaction and ensure it's never cleared. One downside to this wallet is the very primitive way of setting a custom fee. No guidelines, scrollwheel or info. Just a simple box in which to put your fee which won't help intermediate users, only experienced users.
Edit: sidenote on the SegWit implementation by Electrum http://www.crypto-economy.net/electrum-3-0-enables-bech32-segwit-addresses/?lang=en

CoPay

Of all the apps I've tried up to this point, CoPay had the best initializing phase, succinctly explaining risk and security. I can not imagine a better intro to a wallet for a first time bitcoiner. It being of a product of BitPay, of which I am personally not a fan, I have to admit though. This app looks clean, feels fast and is easy to use. It successfully demystified MultiSig functionality in its UI and partnered services are not obtrusive in the design. Downsides are lack of fee setting possibilities and SegWit. The latter I really do not understand given their main core of business. If it wasn't for those last two points, I would not see why not to recommend this wallet.

ArcBit

This app dissapointed me a bit. It starts out of the box, not mentioning any backup seeds or tutorial on the wallet itself or Bitcoin. It has no SegWit, no MultiSig, a lack of features and whilst a backup seed can still be requested from the settings, I feel it is of the utmost importance that such a security measure is not quickly overlooked. The lack of fee management tops it off. While this wallet works just fine and looks just fine, there are too many alternatives out there with better options and functionality for me to ever advise anyone to use this wallet.

CoinSpace

CoinSpace is one of those apps that could be really cool, but completely missed the boat on some other design choices. In-app ads unless you pay 1.6$ or something. Settings hidden behind a CoinSpace login screen. It features multiple tokens though with built in conversion through ShapeShift, which could have been awesome. But the excessive ads are just a big no-no. Lack of SegWit and limited fee options make this one of the least interesting wallets out there.

Simple Bitcoin Wallet

Simple Bitcoin is a very basic, barebone wallet. Feels like a one-man project. Almost no settings possible at all. There's much better out there.

Bither

I oddly liked Bither because of its design that reminded me of websites from the 2005-ish era using lots of gradients. Its one of those apps that you either like or you don't. The UI is not bad, but could be better, there's some functionality hidden in the settings, but not enough to satisfy. One very useful feature is built in BCH and BCG extraction. This is the first app I encountered with built in Bitcoin Gold access. It also has a separate tab with just market price information, which is really useful for the price ticker addicts among us. Furthermore it features Cold/Hot Storage View which allows you to monitor cold storage and with a nice graph shows you the distribution between Hot and Cold. Cool stuff. I would suggest to check it out, I'm sure some people will like and some won't. Do note, no SegWit. I would personally use this as a view-wallet only. Not as a spending wallet.

GreenBits

GreenBits is like the light version of GreenAddress. I tried looking for why one team would make 2 wallets but could not find a definitive answer asides from GreenBits being Android-native. And while some resources state MultiSig functionality and Tor through Orbot, I couldn't find those in this app. It does however sport SegWit and custom fees like GreenAddress. On the UI front I feel much more comfortable with this app though and I could see it being better received by average users. Looks like a good spending wallet without much extra.

Jaxx

Jaxx is a rather large wallet that supports many many many different coins with built in ShapeShift functionality. It did suffer from a hack earlier this year which is why this wallet has been discredited. I would however suggest looking into this one if you are invested in multiple different coins and regularly swap between them to get some financial edge. Lack of SegWit and fee options don't make this an ideal app for Bitcoin-only users.

Xapo

Xapo, known for its cold storage solutions was one of the apps I was eager to check out. Upon starting I however first had to verify through a text message, giving up my phone number, after which I was greeted by a 'Continue with Facebook or email' - screen. Upon choosing email, I was further asked to give up personal information. Nothing personal against these types of business models, but this is not what I am looking for in a mobile wallet. Centralization of personal information is quite in contrast with the decentralized and pseudonymous qualities of cryptocurrencies. This being the 13th wallet I've fired up tonight, I decided to give this one a pass.

Coinomi

Coinomi is very similar to Jaxx in the way that it supports a crapload of different currencies and in-app conversions between different tokens through ShapeShift and additionally Changelly. It does look quite a bit more straightforward though. A good alternative to Jaxx for those multicrypto traders among us. Unfortunately yet again not the best for straight Bitcoiners due to lack of SegWit. It has custom fees though, but much like Electrum, there's no real help here and it's just a manual input.

Mycelium

Mycelium has been my wallet app for a couple years now. Unfortunately the delay in SegWit adoption has me looking elsewhere and in succession writing this article. I really liked the recent addition of the fee scrollwheel, which is still the most detailed and succesful implementation of custom fees in any app I've seen. Having tried out many other apps at this point I can now see Mycelium, while not particulary user-unfriendly, could still very much improve its UI. It is however not a bad wallet, never crashed on me, always ran smooth through multiple updates. But let's not get sentimental here, it's a solid app, but its time for me and maybe you as well to try out something different ;-)

Conclusion

In this excruciatingly long article I've ran through a couple different wallet apps. One thing to learn is that not a single one of these is perfect and there's still room for improvement on many fronts. Which wallet holds your preference today depends largely on what you are looking for in a wallet. Do you want the cheapest transactions, then go for one of the SegWit enabled wallets. Do you like cool functionality, then check out Bither. Is anonymity of a concern to you then Samourai looks like the clear winner. More into multiple coins at once, then Coinomi or Jaxx is the way to go. And this is mobile wallets only, you have your desktop wallets, hardware wallets, cold storage solutions, paper wallets. But I'm all out of ink tonight!
I can't give you specific advice. In this world of cryptocurrencies we are in control of our own money. Being in control of your own money means being responsible for its security too. So make your own decision and due diligence.
Edit: Thanks everyone for the awesome responses. I've had some requests to further mention some important information regarding the wallets. I will write these down here as a memo to myself in the future, at which point I will review the state of mobile apps in greater detail once again. - Open Source or not - iOS version or not - Adding iOS only wallet apps
submitted by Zyntra to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How do you use Bitcoin and Python?

To get started with Bitcoin using Python, we need,
Setup your Computer:
Install Python
Download and install python from http://www.python.org/
Install bitcoin python library
After you finish installing Python, open your command line program and execute below command to install bitcoin python library
pip install bitcoin
Hello Bitcoin — Generate a Private key
We will start with a writing a “Hello World” equivalent of Bitcoin in Python. To write your python, you can need a code or text editor which supports writing in ASCII format. You cannot use MS Word of Wordpad for this. You could use Notepad, but we recommend using Atom Code Editor, a free code editor.
Open your favorite editor and type in below code. In this code, we are first importing the bitcoin library. We are then generating a private key using random_key function and we are then displaying the private key on the screen.
  1. from bitcoin import *my_private_key = random_key()print(my_private_key)Save it as a .py file and then open your command line program and run the above program like this.python
This will print out a private key.
Generate a Public Key
Next we generate a public key. We do this by passing the private key we generated to privtopub function
  1. from bitcoin import *my_private_key = random_key()my_public_key = privtopub(my_private_key)print(my_public_key
Create a bitcoin address
In the previous programs we generated private and public keys. Now, we are going to real bitcoin part. In the below code, we are generating a bitcoin address by passing the public key we generated to pubtoaddr function.
  1. from bitcoin import *my_private_key = random_key()my_public_key = privtopub(my_private_key)my_bitcoin_address = pubtoaddr(my_public_key)print(addr)
Create a Multi-signature Address
Next, we create a multi-signature bitcoin address. Multi-signature address is an address that is associated with more than one private key. So, we first create 3 public and private keys. We then create a multi-sig by passing the 3 public keys to mk_multisig_script function. Finally, the resulting multi-sig is passed to scriptaddr function to create the multi signature bitcoin address.
  1. from bitcoin import *my_private_key1 = random_key()print(‘Private Key 1: ‘ + my_private_key1)my_public_key1 = privtopub(my_private_key1)print(‘Public Key 1: ‘ + my_public_key1)my_private_key2 = random_key()print(‘Private Key 2: ‘ + my_private_key2)my_public_key2 = privtopub(my_private_key2)print(‘Public Key 2: ‘ + my_public_key2)my_private_key3 = random_key()print(‘Private Key 3: ‘ + my_private_key3)my_public_key3 = privtopub(my_private_key3)print(‘Public Key 3: ‘ + my_public_key3)my_multi_sig = mk_multisig_script(my_private_key1, my_private_key2, my_private_key3, 2,3)my_multi_address = scriptaddr(my_multi_sig)print(‘Multi-Address: ‘ + my_multi_address)
View address transaction history
We can also look at pre-existing bitcoin addresses’ transactional history. We do this passing a valid bitcoin address to function history.
  1. from bitcoin import *print(history(a_vaid_bitcoin_address))
If you don’t have an address, you can look one up from Blockchain.
Conclusion
In this tutorial, we introduced bitcoin with python. We saw how to get set up with python for bitcoin. We saw how to generate a private key, public key, and a bitcoin address. We also saw how to create a multi-signature bitcoin address and how to look at the transactional history of a bitcoin address.
Source:Medium.com
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Why IBM’s Blockchain Isn’t a Real Blockchain

Why IBM’s Blockchain Isn’t a Real Blockchain
https://preview.redd.it/6iwsjmkd41831.jpg?width=1024&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=94ad098dc9cd9afc0649ef950075efbdf2b2959b
Stuart Popejoy has 15 years experience in building trading systems and exchange backbones for the financial industry. Prior to co-founding Kadena with Will Martino in 2016 and becoming the company's president, Stuart worked at JPMorgan Chase in the new products division, where he led and developed JPMorgan’s main blockchain product, Juno. Stuart also wrote the algorithmic trading scripts for JPMorgan, which informed his creation of Kadena’s simple, purpose-built smart contract language, Pact.
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Cointelegraph.
IBM is a major player in the world of enterprise blockchain, offering a blockchain platform based on Hyperledger Fabric and launching blockchain pilots with large companies like Walmart and Aetna.
As one of many contributors (including recently announced Microsoft and Salesforce) to the nonprofit, the open source Hyperledger Foundation, IBM has made a huge investment in promoting Fabric as a private or “permissioned” blockchain, implying that it offers features in common with well-known blockchains like Bitcoin or Ethereum, while somehow removing any aspects that might be “unsuitable for enterprise.”
However, the technology IBM is actually selling and calling “blockchain” — i.e., Hyperledger Fabric — sacrifices the most important features of a true blockchain, whether permissioned or public. Fabric’s architecture is far more complex than any blockchain platform while also being less secure against tampering and attacks. You would think that a “private” blockchain would at least offer scalability and performance, but Fabric fails here as well. Simply put, pilots built on Fabric will face a complex and insecure deployment that won’t be able to scale with their businesses.

Blockchain options on the market

When I worked at JPMorgan Chase in 2016, I led an emerging technology group that researched and vetted blockchains for the bank’s potential use and strategic investment. This involved in-depth analyses of early versions of Hyperledger, Axoni, Symbiont, Ripple and Ethereum. It was clear back then that the blockchain options on the market were technologically inadequate for real enterprise use cases. Unfortunately, we see these same core problems today with Hyperledger Fabric.
The concerns we raised included: How does a blockchain’s smart contract language safely and simply express complex business rules? How are public-key signatures guaranteed to be valid? Can the system scale to additional participants (nodes) without drastically slowing down performance? And, for a future-thinking enterprise, can you interoperate with other public and private blockchains easily?
Using these questions as a framework, I believe that IBM’s system fundamentally lacks the required elements of a blockchain, with misleading performance numbers and questionable long-term business viability. While my colleagues and I don’t see the numbers game (transactions per second, node count) as the only factor in blockchain adoption, we do think it’s important to educate people on what a blockchain is and is not. This education will hopefully help everyone better understand the landscape of the emerging technology of blockchain.

What blockchain is and isn’t

In order to really understand where IBM’s blockchain stands, we need to look at the very definition of a blockchain itself. A blockchain is, at its core, a decentralized immutable ledger of events or transactions in which truth is enforced by a consensus mechanism. In public blockchains like Bitcoin and Ethereum, this consensus is achieved through Proof of Work, or “mining.” In permissioned blockchain, consensus can be achieved through participants supplying cryptographic signatures to vote on what gets written. Either way, no central authority arbitrates what is true.
IBM’s definition of blockchain captures the distributed and immutable elements of blockchain but conveniently leaves out decentralized consensus –– that’s because Hyperledger Fabric doesn’t require a true consensus mechanism at all. Instead, it suggests using an “ordering service” called Kafka. The problem is that, without enforced, democratized, cryptographically secure voting between participants, you can’t prove that somebody hasn’t tampered with the ledger. A fault-tolerant consensus is a hallmark feature of a blockchain, and without it, IBM’s “blockchain” is little more than a time-stamped list of entries.
Fabric’s architecture exposes numerous vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious coordination. For instance, it introduces public-key cryptography "inside the network" with validator signatures, which provide the main security assurance but originate after an externally signed transaction has been submitted. This fundamentally invalidates the proven security model of Bitcoin and other real blockchains, in which the provenance of any transaction is assured only by an external user’s public key signature, and cannot be intermediated in any way by the system. In sharp contrast, the only signatures that matter on Fabric for consensus are those of the validator, while the user signatures disappear into an arbitrary dataset replicated through the network.
Fabric researchers play fast and loose with performance numbers because, fundamentally, Fabric’s architecture cannot scale while maintaining peak performance. Fabric uses a multichain environment (called "channels") to provide confidentiality between participants. Providing confidentiality is an important feature for private “enterprise” blockchain and necessarily involves trade-offs and complexity, but a multichain solution is a bad choice for scalability. It also makes for a woefully complex deployment, with nonuniform nodes, unreliable smart contracts and proliferating potential points of failure.
Thus, performance numbers for a standard Fabric deployment are unimpressive to start, degrade rapidly as nodes get added and are single-channel: If you want to transact with the whole network across multiple channels, the numbers aren’t even relevant. Even so, when looking at individual channels, this system struggles to get above 800 transactions per second (TPS), but even a 16-channel configuration can barely get above 1,500 TPS, with latencies reaching well into the 10-20 second range at the upper throughputs.
Recent efforts to speed up Fabric have resulted in claims of reaching up to 20,000 TPS, but the changes made to the architecture by researchers move so far from blockchain as to be unrecognizable: Endorsers no longer act as validators and Kafka is enshrined as the only possible ordering service (Fabric, in theory, can accept a true blockchain consensus, but it would be so slow that nobody would ever use it in production). Finally, these are still single-channel numbers, meaning the whole notion of a blockchain as a shared source of truth is invalidated.

Why smart contracts and hybrid options matter

The final points of consideration when looking at blockchains are how they intend to scale beyond private databases and how their tools –– such as their smart contract language –– intend to help businesses succeed on a larger scale. Remember, a smart contract is not just a piece of code; it is a representation of business logic. A smart contract may secure a house on the blockchain, assure a digital identity, or even represent an escrow transaction between people buying and selling a used car. It is important that a smart contract is reliable and always does what it says it will.
When it comes to building anything on a blockchain, you need to be able to represent what you want to do (buy, sell, package data, etc.) through smart contracts. The easier or simpler your language is to use, the faster you will build the thing you want and get it in front of the eyes of stakeholders. More importantly, you want the smart contract’s function to actually generate revenue or some positive outcome for your business.
Hyperledger Fabric’s smart contracts (“chaincode”) can be written in a number of programming languages, including general Javascript or Go. But there are trade-offs between the convenience of a programmer already knowing a general purpose language and the security and safety that a domain-specific language provides. When the stakes are as high as in blockchain –– where millions of dollars can be lost if the code is buggy or incorrect because it wasn’t designed for blockchain –– the smart contract language must be purpose-built and safe by design. Ideally, it would also be easy to learn and simple to use in the desired blockchain environment. Chaincode largely fails in this regard; we found it took some 150 lines of code just to execute the classic programmer tutorial “hello world.” And this massive amount of code can become a breeding ground for those million-dollar bugs.

Not ready for the future

Increasingly, the most sophisticated observers of blockchain ecosystems are realizing that private and public blockchains will not exist in a vacuum but instead will want to work together: A private network will want to make a token available to consumers on a public blockchain, and a public blockchain’s decentralized application will want to store sensitive information on a private blockchain. Unfortunately, users of IBM Fabric (as well as R3 Corda) could find themselves "cut off" from public blockchains by the sheer incompatibility of the architecture — but also by the inability of their smart contract language to execute seamlessly in both a public and private environment.
As IBM dominates a lot of the enterprise blockchain press cycle with its announcements of partnerships, it is important to look under the hood at what the technology can actually do. IBM’s “blockchain” technology falls short in numerous ways — including security, performance and reliability — and as such, provides an inferior solution for organizations looking to use blockchain to achieve meaningful business improvements. To truly realize the value of blockchain, sophisticated customers will look to challengers offering better tools, better blockchains, and a better vision for the future and how we utilize technology.
submitted by Rajladumor1 to omgfin [link] [comments]

An in-depth overview of 15 different mobile Bitcoin wallets

Disclaimer: A lot of time went into writing this and more research than I anticipated. Errors are not just possible, they are certain. If you find any mistakes, please reach out to me and I'll edit. Furthermore I know I probably missed a couple apps, there are a lot out there. If I missed a big one, then again contact me and I'll consider adding it. If you are reading this in the future, note that these apps update regularly, anything mentioned here may have changed by the time you are reading it.

What is a mobile wallet?

A mobile Bitcoin wallet is an application for a mobile device which acts as a lightweight wallet and allows you to store, send and receive Bitcoin (or other cryptocurrencies and tokens). Mobile wallets use SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) to allow wallet functionality without having to download the whole blockchain. This is very important as barely any mobile phones have enough storage space required for the full blockchain. Mobile wallets are also considered hotwallets, meaning they have an active connection to the internet. The mere fact of being 'online' allows for a number of attack vectors and as such should never be used to store large amounts. It is however not unsafe per se. Private keys are stored locally and encrypted. Some wallets keep backups of those encrypted private keys on a server of their own, and this is something to take note of, but not to fear. So without further ado, lets get to it. I focused on Android wallets, but many of the wallets mentioned here have iOS versions.

Quick overview

Name Segwit Multisig Backup Other coins Fee Choice Privacy Options Depth/Complexity
Samourai Yes No 12 word seed + passphrase No Custom A ton Advanced
Bread No No 12 word seed No 2 Options No Beginner
GreenAddress Yes Yes 24 word seed No Custom Tor Optional Intermediate
AirBitz No No Private seed No Custom-ish No Beginner
Electrum Yes Yes 12 word seed No Custom Proxy possible Intermediate
Copay No Yes 12 word seed No Custom No Beginner
ArcBit No No 12 word seed No Fixed or Dynamic No Beginner
CoinSpace No No 12 word seed BCH/LTC/ETH 3 Options No Intermediate
Simple Bitcoin No No 12 word seed No None No Beginner
Bither No No 12 word seed BCH/BCG 4 choices No Intermediate
GreenBits Yes No 24 word seed No Custom No Beginner
Jaxx No No 12 word seed A ton 3 options No Advanced
Xapo / / / / / Public /
Coinomi No No 18 word seed A ton Custom No Advanced
Mycelium No No 12 word seed No Scrollwheel Tor Optional Intermediate

Wallet Breakdown

Samourai

Samourai focusses heavily on anonymity and obfuscation. Addresses are never used more than once. When making a transaction there is an obfuscation slider. Samourai has had SegWit enabled since October. Furthermore it offers a plethora of different features, too much to sum up here. If you are an advanced crypto-user you should definitely check out this wallet and their website which explains all of the different features. The UI takes a bit of getting used to though.

Breadwallet

Breadwallet is a very simple to use, straightforward app. The UI is slick and intuitive and in-app support to basic questions is very well incorporated. This could be a good wallet for a new person to the scene. The lack of advanced features will make this app not the go-to for more experienced users. It does however feature fingerprint authentication, which is cool, as well as BCH extraction. The lack if SegWit and complete absence of custom fee's is a problem though, especially since fees have gone up during the recent BTC spike. With only 2 fee options to choose from I simply can not recommend this wallet to people who are looking to make frequent transactions.

GreenAddress

When I first started with Greenaddress I didn't like the UI, I found it a bit clumsy. So definitely not user-friendly for a beginner. On the plus side it allows a choice of 2FA settings. Furthermore it has SegWit enabled and it has some advanced features like nLockTime transactions and it offers a service for instant transactions. This all feels very Lightning Network-y, which makes sense as GreenAddress is a part of Blockstream. Our friends in the other sub will most likely have something to say about this. I'll refrain from this and just say the following: this is an advanced wallet with promising features. If they clean up their UI a bit I could see myself using this without hesitation. The fact that they have MultiSig is a big plus as most mobile wallets do not have this functionality.

AirBitz

Unlike any other wallet I fired up at that point, this app did not prompt me with a 12- or 24-word seed. Instead it made me make an account, the regular username/password combo. After some research I found that these are not stored in a local database on their end. Which means that recovering your password in case of loss like with every other username/password login method we are so used to, is not possible. It is merely a different representation of an encryption key, allowing you access to your private keys. It features some interesting stuff though, NFC-compliant transactions and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for example. Clearly this app is meant to be a bridge between users and merchants and has focus on making regular in-person transactions. Thus it mimics some non-crypto related payment apps that we have. Personally, I am not a fan, but I can appreciate the design philosophy and I would't be surprised if their design model worked very well in the future with the LN or with other crypto's that focus on small payments. As for the UI, it's fairly simple, yet horribly cluttered with partnered services. Good for non-techies maybe, but not for more experienced crypto-enthusiasts.

Electrum

Much like the desktop wallet I used years ago when I first started with Bitcoin, the mobile wallet is minimal. Straightforward and without fancy colors or UI. For those of us who have known the internet before Facebook, this app will feel strangely familiar. This is a classic example of a no-nonsense wallet with the features that really matter. SegWit and MultiSig enabled. A further lack of advanced options might be a turn-off for some users out there though. I did however find the option to spend coins from unconfirmed transactions. This could be very useful in case you want to cancel out a previously stuck or erroneous transaction and ensure it's never cleared. One downside to this wallet is the very primitive way of setting a custom fee. No guidelines, scrollwheel or info. Just a simple box in which to put your fee which won't help intermediate users, only experienced users.

CoPay

Of all the apps I've tried up to this point, CoPay had the best initializing phase, succinctly explaining risk and security. I can not imagine a better intro to a wallet for a first time bitcoiner. It being of a product of BitPay, of which I am personally not a fan, I have to admit though. This app looks clean, feels fast and is easy to use. It successfully demystified MultiSig functionality in its UI and partnered services are not obtrusive in the design. Downsides are lack of fee setting possibilities and SegWit. The latter I really do not understand given their main core of business. If it wasn't for those last two points, I would not see why not to recommend this wallet.

ArcBit

This app dissapointed me a bit. It starts out of the box, not mentioning any backup seeds or tutorial on the wallet itself or Bitcoin. It has no SegWit, no MultiSig, a lack of features and whilst a backup seed can still be requested from the settings, I feel it is of the utmost importance that such a security measure is not quickly overlooked. The lack of fee management tops it off. While this wallet works just fine and looks just fine, there are too many alternatives out there with better options and functionality for me to ever advise anyone to use this wallet.

CoinSpace

CoinSpace is one of those apps that could be really cool, but completely missed the boat on some other design choices. In-app ads unless you pay 1.6$ or something. Settings hidden behind a CoinSpace login screen. It features multiple tokens though with built in conversion through ShapeShift, which could have been awesome. But the excessive ads are just a big no-no. Lack of SegWit and limited fee options make this one of the least interesting wallets out there.

Simple Bitcoin Wallet

Simple Bitcoin is a very basic, barebone wallet. Feels like a one-man project. Almost no settings possible at all. There's much better out there.

Bither

I oddly liked Bither because of its design that reminded me of websites from the 2005-ish era using lots of gradients. Its one of those apps that you either like or you don't. The UI is not bad, but could be better, there's some functionality hidden in the settings, but not enough to satisfy. One very useful feature is built in BCH and BCG extraction. This is the first app I encountered with built in Bitcoin Gold access. It also has a separate tab with just market price information, which is really useful for the price ticker addicts among us. Furthermore it features Cold/Hot Storage View which allows you to monitor cold storage and with a nice graph shows you the distribution between Hot and Cold. Cool stuff. I would suggest to check it out, I'm sure some people will like and some won't. Do note, no SegWit. I would personally use this as a view-wallet only. Not as a spending wallet.

GreenBits

GreenBits is like the light version of GreenAddress. I tried looking for why one team would make 2 wallets but could not find a definitive answer asides from GreenBits being Android-native. And while some resources state MultiSig functionality and Tor through Orbot, I couldn't find those in this app. It does however sport SegWit and custom fees like GreenAddress. On the UI front I feel much more comfortable with this app though and I could see it being better received by average users. Looks like a good spending wallet without much extra.

Jaxx

Jaxx is a rather large wallet that supports many many many different coins with built in ShapeShift functionality. It did suffer from a hack earlier this year which is why this wallet has been discredited. I would however suggest looking into this one if you are invested in multiple different coins and regularly swap between them to get some financial edge. Lack of SegWit and fee options don't make this an ideal app for Bitcoin-only users.

Xapo

Xapo, known for its cold storage solutions was one of the apps I was eager to check out. Upon starting I however first had to verify through a text message, giving up my phone number, after which I was greeted by a 'Continue with Facebook or email' - screen. Upon choosing email, I was further asked to give up personal information. Nothing personal against these types of business models, but this is not what I am looking for in a mobile wallet. Centralization of personal information is quite in contrast with the decentralized and pseudonymous qualities of cryptocurrencies. This being the 13th wallet I've fired up tonight, I decided to give this one a pass.

Coinomi

Coinomi is very similar to Jaxx in the way that it supports a crapload of different currencies and in-app conversions between different tokens through ShapeShift and additionally Changelly. It does look quite a bit more straightforward though. A good alternative to Jaxx for those multicrypto traders among us. Unfortunately yet again not the best for straight Bitcoiners due to lack of SegWit. It has custom fees though, but much like Electrum, there's no real help here and it's just a manual input.

Mycelium

Mycelium has been my wallet app for a couple years now. Unfortunately the delay in SegWit adoption has me looking elsewhere and in succession writing this article. I really liked the recent addition of the fee scrollwheel, which is still the most detailed and succesful implementation of custom fees in any app I've seen. Having tried out many other apps at this point I can now see Mycelium, while not particulary user-unfriendly, could still very much improve its UI. It is however not a bad wallet, never crashed on me, always ran smooth through multiple updates. But let's not get sentimental here, it's a solid app, but its time for me and maybe you as well to try out something different ;-)

Conclusion

In this excruciatingly long article I've ran through a couple different wallet apps. One thing to learn is that not a single one of these is perfect and there's still room for improvement on many fronts. Which wallet holds your preference today depends largely on what you are looking for in a wallet. Do you want the cheapest transactions, then go for one of the SegWit enabled wallets. Do you like cool functionality, then check out Bither. Is anonymity of a concern to you then Samourai looks like the clear winner. More into multiple coins at once, then Coinomi or Jaxx is the way to go. And this is mobile wallets only, you have your desktop wallets, hardware wallets, cold storage solutions, paper wallets. But I'm all out of ink tonight!
I can't give you specific advise. In this world of cryptocurrencies we are in control of our own money. Being in control of your own money means being responsible for its security too. So make your own decision and due diligence.
Edit: Thanks everyone for the awesome responses. I've had some requests to further mention some important information regarding the wallets. I will write these down here as a memo to myself in the future, at which point I will review the state of mobile apps in greater detail once again. - Open Source or not - iOS version or not - Adding iOS only wallet apps
submitted by Zyntra to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

How to use Bitcoin wallet Electrum over tor with tails


You have Three choices with Electrum over tails


Electrum is a bitcoin client that is particularly suited to the context of Tails because:
To start Electrum choose Applications ▸ Internet ▸ Electrum Bitcoin Wallet .

https://preview.redd.it/862homjp0x421.png?width=1366&format=png&auto=webp&s=5077d4638b19defbcef76f741627aa2ce9e7d407


In most cases you will be deailing with Multisig so this tutorial will deal with that

This tutorial shows how to create a 2 of 2 multisig wallet. A 2 of 2 multisig consists of 2 separate wallets (usually on separate machines and potentially controlled by separate people) that have to be used in conjunction in order to access the funds. Both wallets have the same set of Addresses.

https://preview.redd.it/hlypxvoc0x421.png?width=1366&format=png&auto=webp&s=ad840fdb899157a5e17ab149258a475fb1599d92

Create a pair of 2-of-2 wallets

Each cosigner needs to do this: In the menu select File->New, then select “Multi-signature wallet”. On the next screen, select 2 of 2.

https://preview.redd.it/0vbpb8ke0x421.png?width=1366&format=png&auto=webp&s=19d9cb77acfc0e371cd96c7426d01373711c7f0b

After generating a seed (keep it safely!) you will need to provide the master public key of the other wallet.

https://preview.redd.it/rmb7c2egtw421.png?width=577&format=png&auto=webp&s=0982f7715acfa189fea550d57f9ed139e1cc63f6
Put the master public key of the other wallet into the lower box. Of course when you create the other wallet, you put the master public key of this one.

You will need to do this in parallel for the two wallets. Note that you can press cancel during this step, and reopen the file later.

Receiving

Check that both wallets generate the same set of Addresses. You can now send to these Addresses (note they start with a “3”) with any wallet that can send to P2SH Addresses.

Spending

To spend coins from a 2-of-2 wallet, two cosigners need to sign a transaction collaboratively.
To accomplish this, create a transaction using one of the wallets (by filling out the form on the “send” tab)
After signing, a window is shown with the transaction details.
https://preview.redd.it/bcuc6ktltw421.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=f602255417136e12565870198c3d5ac68d5a6d9c

The transaction has to be sent to the second wallet.

to do this

Use the Cosigner Pool Plugin

For this to work the Plugin “Cosigner Pool” needs to be enabled (Tools -> Plugins) with both wallets.

Once the plugin is enabled, you will see a button labeled “Send to cosigner”. Clicking it sends the partially signed transaction to a central server. Note that the transaction is encrypted with your cosigner’s master public key.
https://preview.redd.it/r1b3dlqtvw421.png?width=407&format=png&auto=webp&s=502f8227778b57d1c9619cd6b60ae0726dd9ebb2
When the cosigner wallet is started, it will get a notification that a partially signed transaction is available:
https://preview.redd.it/xezoittxvw421.png?width=491&format=png&auto=webp&s=5392bd8ffb418d07d1c06a844867b1a0bd3cf82e
The transaction is encrypted with the cosigner’s master public key; the password is needed to decrypt it.

you can now add the second signature for the transaction (using the “sign” button). It will then be broadcast to the network.
submitted by StaySafeStaySecure to StaySafeStaySecure [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] ? Lightning Network Megathread ?

The following post by codedaway is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7ojkoz
The original post's content was as follows:
This post is a collaboration with the Bitcoin community to create a one-stop source for Lightning Network information.
There are still questions in the FAQ that are unanswered, if you know the answer and can provide a source please do so!

?What is the Lightning Network? ?

Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

Lightning Network Experts on Twitter

  • @rusty_twit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • @starkness - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • @roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • @snyke - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • @JackMallers - (Jack Mallers - Zap)
  • @tdryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • @jcp - (Joseph Poon - Lightning Labs)
  • @stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • @bitconner - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallet
Place a transaction
Instant Swaps for Altcoins using Lightning

Lightning on Mainnet

Atomic Swaps

Developer Documentation and Resources

Lightning implementations:

  • LND - Lightning Network Daemon (Golang)
  • eclair - A Scala implementation of the Lightning Network (Scala)
  • lit - Lightning Network node software (Golang)
  • c-lightning - A Lightning Network implementation in C
  • lightning-onion - Onion Routed Micropayments for the Lightning Network (Golang)
  • lightning-integration - Lightning Integration Testing Framework
  • ptarmigan - C++ BOLT-Compliant Lightning Network Implementation [Incomplete]

Libraries

submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

I've just spent over 14 hours writing the definitive beginner's guide to buying Bitcoins. Let me know if you think something is missing

I've been writing Bitcoin tutorials for a long time now. I finally decided to sit down and compile all of my tutorials into the one definitive beginner's guide to buying Bitcoins. The guide goes over the following:
Of course I'd like to continue and develop this guide as more and more methods are added to the Bitcoin ecosystem so any feedback would be appreciated.
BTW - the guide is 100% free and if you prefer a PDF version you can download one here.
submitted by BTC_Hamster to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Particl's Proof of Stake system

Hello all, In this article i like to explain to you the Proof of Stake system that Particl uses.  
(Particl was officially launched July 17, 2017 // former umbra.Shadowproject.io)
 
Specifics:
Total Coins: 8,634,140 PART
Network: Proof of Stake
Block time: 2 minutes
The Foundation receives a 10% of every stake to sustain long term development and hire more devs/bounties etc. one stake is currently 1.5 part.
 
Staking reward per year
first year 5%
second year 4%
third year 3%
forth year 2% ++
 
You can calculate your stakes at different network weights (25%,50%,75%..) with the staking calculator (link below). Currently it is about 50-60%. The Network Weight Information can be called via getstakinginfo command in cli or qt-console) also in the partyman tool via ./partyman status
 
https://particl.wiki/staking
 
Auguste Kerckhoffs demanded that security must depend entirely or at least in large part on the key. He describes the requirements for secure encryption as follows: "A procedure is safe if you can not crack it, even though you know the code." In 1883, Auguste Kerckhoffs, in his book La Cryptographie Militaire, describes the following six rules derived from his studies of historical cryptography, which should be followed by everyone if he wants to keep his secret.
 
 
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auguste_Kerckhoffs
 
With this in mind im totally confident in the solid Proof of Stake setup. Particl a btcfork on latest bitcoin codebase 0.15x is designed to let everyone participate in the network while maintaining the security of it.
 
To be honest, in key principles it is very simple, but all together it still is a lot of stuff to talk about. Cause Particl's Proof of Stake system is different from other passive income systems.
The pure PoS (without masternodes or something similar, should cause less centralization and more adoption in the long term)
 

Cold Staking

Cold Staking makes the whole staking process quantum resistant, you will be able to stake from a virtual server with a public node (that dont has any funds on it, but it stakes your offline/cold storage coins and only has the ability to stake and not to spend any funds).
Besides that the PoS of Particl will get merged together with the Market features (voting and of course the Marketplace fees that gets flooded into the Rewards).
If Particl continues to get adopted in the e-commerce & cryptocurrencie space, this really is a factor everyone should ask themselves if it could be worth investing.
 
It is still a bit of road to go (Q1 2018) and there are some other projects, but i cant see one that puts the whole vision of free and decentralized trading into one, while maintaining trustlessnes and simplicity.
 
Particl already has RingCT and CT working on Bitcoin Codebase & a legal foundation sitting in Switzerland.
 
Come join and earn passive income, while strengthen & supporting the network
 
Name Downloads
Electron Gui Electron Gui
QT Wallet/CLI QT-Wallet
Mobile Wallet Copay App Android
 

Tutorials:

 
Visit Particl.io for more information.
 
Greetings
 
part-linux
 
submitted by sdc-linux to Particl [link] [comments]

BTC purchase questions, Online, Hardware, Paper wallets..

I’ve been procrastinating purchasing BTC since November (originally learned about it when it was around $400 USD a few years ago * facepalm *). I overthink everything and have specific questions. The main thing holding me back is where to store bitcoins securely. My intention is to make an investment as opposed to use as a currency, but have a feeling many people will be using an electronic currency by the time I need a walker have bionic legs.
I opened a coin base account and started a transaction, I finally have >0 BTC. My research shows bitcoin is not a huge fan between account closings and lack of customer support, but their website is as reassuring as other “real” banks. I intend on transferring this once the transaction finalizes. I’ve read a few articles on hardware/app wallets and really like what I read about Trezor, ledger, bread wallet, and mycelium.
Sooo
I just want to be a part of this revolution before we talk in mBTC. List of helpful research and things I’ve read for those who come across this later:
submitted by Elderman to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] ? Lightning Network Megathread ?

The following post by codedaway is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7pwna9
The original post's content was as follows:
This post is a collaboration with the Bitcoin community to create a one-stop source for Lightning Network information.
There are still questions in the FAQ that are unanswered, if you know the answer and can provide a source please do so!

?What is the Lightning Network? ?

Explanations:

Image Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

  • starkbot - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • cfromknecht - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • RustyReddit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • cdecker - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • Dryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • josephpoon - (Joseph Poon)
  • fdrn - (Fabrice Drouin - ACINQ )
  • pmpadiou - (Pierre-Marie Padiou - ACINQ)

Lightning Network Experts on Twitter

  • @starkness - (Elizabeth Stark - Lightning Labs)
  • @roasbeef - (Olaoluwa Osuntokun - Lightning Labs)
  • @stile65 - (Alex Akselrod - Lightning Labs)
  • @bitconner - (Conner Fromknecht - Lightning Labs)
  • @johanth - (Johan Halseth - Lightning Labs)
  • @bvu - (Bryan Vu - Lightning Labs)
  • @rusty_twit - (Rusty Russell - Blockstream)
  • @snyke - (Christian Decker - Blockstream)
  • @JackMallers - (Jack Mallers - Zap)
  • @tdryja - (Tadge Dryja - Digital Currency Initiative)
  • @jcp - (Joseph Poon)
  • @alexbosworth - (Alex Bosworth - yalls.org)

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallets

Place a testnet transaction

Altcoin Trading using Lightning

  • ZigZag - Disclaimer You must trust ZigZag to send to Target Address

Lightning on Mainnet

  • https://...
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Lightning Network Megathread

The following post by codedaway is being replicated because the post has been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7npeh6
The original post's content was as follows:
Hi Everyone,
I'm trying to create a post that can be stickied with regards to the Lightning Network. This post should be used to provide as many links to as many resources as organized as possible. This is obviously a large task and I've tried to start it in hopes that I can crowdsource this in the comments to keep adding content to this post. Feel free to recommend any additions but please provide sources for your information. Also please correct myself or anything that appears up here that seems incorrect and I'll do my best to edit quickly.

What is the Lightning Network? ?

Explanations:

Specifications / White Papers

Videos

Lightning Network Experts on Reddit

Medium Posts

Learning Resources

Books

Desktop Interfaces

Web Interfaces

Tutorials and resources

Lightning on Testnet

Lightning Wallet
Place a transaction

Lightning on Mainnet

Atomic Swaps

Developer Documentation and Resources

Lightning implementations:

  • LND - Lightning Network Daemon (Golang)
  • eclair - A Scala implementation of the Lightning Network (Scala)
  • lit - Lightning Network node software (Golang)
  • c-lightning - A Lightning Network implementation in C
  • lightning-onion - Onion Routed Micropayments for the Lightning Network (Golang)
  • lightning-integration - Lightning Integration Testing Framework
  • ptarmigan - C++ BOLT-Compliant Lightning Network Implementation [Incomplete]

Libraries

Lightning Network Visualizer (Testnet)

Community

Slack

IRC

IRC channel

  • #li...
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] An in-depth overview of different mobile wallets

The following post by Zyntra is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7k3ydl
The original post's content was as follows:
Disclaimer: A lot of time went into writing this and more research than I anticipated. Errors are not just possible, they are certain. If you find any mistakes, please reach out to me and I'll edit. Furthermore I know I probably missed a couple apps, there are a lot out there. If I missed a big one, then again contact me and I'll consider adding it. If you are reading this in the future, note that these apps update regularly, anything mentioned here may have changed by the time you are reading it.

What is a mobile wallet?

A mobile Bitcoin wallet is an application for a mobile device which acts as a lightweight wallet and allows you to store, send and receive Bitcoin (or other cryptocurrencies and tokens). Mobile wallets use SPV (Simplified Payment Verification) to allow wallet functionality without having to download the whole blockchain. This is very important as barely any mobile phones have enough storage space required for the full blockchain. Mobile wallets are also considered hotwallets, meaning they have an active connection to the internet. The mere fact of being 'online' allows for a number of attack vectors and as such should never be used to store large amounts. It is however not unsafe per se. Private keys are stored locally and encrypted. Some wallets keep backups of those encrypted private keys on a server of their own, and this is something to take note of, but not to fear. So without further ado, lets get to it. I focused on Android wallets, but many of the wallets mentioned here have iOS versions.

Quick overview

Name Segwit Multisig Backup Other coins Fee Choice Privacy Options Depth/Complexity
Samourai Yes No 12 word seed + passphrase No Custom A ton Advanced
Bread No No 12 word seed No 2 Options No Beginner
GreenAddress Yes Yes 24 word seed No Custom Tor Optional Intermediate
AirBitz No No Private seed No Custom-ish No Beginner
Electrum Yes Yes 12 word seed No Custom Proxy possible Intermediate
Copay No Yes 12 word seed No Custom No Beginner
ArcBit No No 12 word seed No Fixed or Dynamic No Beginner
CoinSpace No No 12 word seed BCH/LTC/ETH 3 Options No Intermediate
Simple Bitcoin No No 12 word seed No None No Beginner
Bither No No 12 word seed BCH/BCG 4 choices No Intermediate
GreenBits Yes No 24 word seed No Custom No Beginner
Jaxx No No 12 word seed A ton 3 options No Advanced
Xapo / / / / / Public /
Coinomi No No 18 word seed A ton Custom No Advanced
Mycelium No No 12 word seed No Scrollwheel Tor Optional Intermediate

Wallet Breakdown

Samourai

Samourai focusses heavily on anonymity and obfuscation. Addresses are never used more than once. When making a transaction there is an obfuscation slider. Samourai has had SegWit enabled since October. Furthermore it offers a plethora of different features, too much to sum up here. If you are an advanced crypto-user you should definitely check out this wallet and their website which explains all of the different features. The UI takes a bit of getting used to though.

Breadwallet

Breadwallet is a very simple to use, straightforward app. The UI is slick and intuitive and in-app support to basic questions is very well incorporated. This could be a good wallet for a new person to the scene. The lack of advanced features will make this app not the go-to for more experienced users. It does however feature fingerprint authentication, which is cool, as well as BCH extraction. The lack of SegWit and complete absence of custom fee's is a problem though, especially since fees have gone up during the recent BTC spike. With only 2 fee options to choose from I simply can not recommend this wallet to people who are looking to make frequent transactions.

GreenAddress

When I first started with Greenaddress I didn't like the UI, I found it a bit clumsy. So definitely not user-friendly for a beginner. On the plus side it allows a choice of 2FA settings. Furthermore it has SegWit enabled and it has some advanced features like nLockTime transactions and it offers a service for instant transactions. This all feels very Lightning Network-y, which makes sense as GreenAddress is a part of Blockstream. Our friends in the other sub will most likely have something to say about this. I'll refrain from this and just say the following: this is an advanced wallet with promising features. If they clean up their UI a bit I could see myself using this without hesitation. The fact that they have MultiSig is a big plus as most mobile wallets do not have this functionality.

AirBitz

Unlike any other wallet I fired up at that point, this app did not prompt me with a 12- or 24-word seed. Instead it made me make an account, the regular username/password combo. After some research I found that these are not stored in a local database on their end. Which means that recovering your password in case of loss like with every other username/password login method we are so used to, is not possible. It is merely a different representation of an encryption key, allowing you access to your private keys. It features some interesting stuff though, NFC-compliant transactions and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) for example. Clearly this app is meant to be a bridge between users and merchants and has focus on making regular in-person transactions. Thus it mimics some non-crypto related payment apps that we have. Personally, I am not a fan, but I can appreciate the design philosophy and I would't be surprised if their design model worked very well in the future with the LN or with other crypto's that focus on small payments. As for the UI, it's fairly simple, yet horribly cluttered with partnered services. Good for non-techies maybe, but not for more experienced crypto-enthusiasts.

Electrum

Much like the desktop wallet I used years ago when I first started with Bitcoin, the mobile wallet is minimal. Straightforward and without fancy colors or UI. For those of us who have known the internet before Facebook, this app will feel strangely familiar. This is a classic example of a no-nonsense wallet with the features that really matter. SegWit and MultiSig enabled. A further lack of advanced options might be a turn-off for some users out there though. I did however find the option to spend coins from unconfirmed transactions. This could be very useful in case you want to cancel out a previously stuck or erroneous transaction and ensure it's never cleared. One downside to this wallet is the very primitive way of setting a custom fee. No guidelines, scrollwheel or info. Just a simple box in which to put your fee which won't help intermediate users, only experienced users.
Edit: sidenote on the SegWit implementation by Electrum http://www.crypto-economy.net/electrum-3-0-enables-bech32-segwit-addresses/?lang=en

CoPay

Of all the apps I've tried up to this point, CoPay had the best initializing phase, succinctly explaining risk and security. I can not imagine a better intro to a wallet for a first time bitcoiner. It being of a product of BitPay, of which I am personally not a fan, I have to admit though. This app looks clean, feels fast and is easy to use. It successfully demystified MultiSig functionality in its UI and partnered services are not obtrusive in the design. Downsides are lack of fee setting possibilities and SegWit. The latter I really do not understand given their main core of business. If it wasn't for those last two points, I would not see why not to recommend this wallet.

ArcBit

This app dissapointed me a bit. It starts out of the box, not mentioning any backup seeds or tutorial on the wallet itself or Bitcoin. It has no SegWit, no MultiSig, a lack of features and whilst a backup seed can still be requested from the settings, I feel it is of the utmost importance that such a security measure is not quickly overlooked. The lack of fee management tops it off. While this wallet works just fine and looks just fine, there are too many alternatives out there with better options and functionality for me to ever advise anyone to use this wallet.

CoinSpace

CoinSpace is one of those apps that could be really cool, but completely missed the boat on some other design choices. In-app ads unless you pay 1.6$ or something. Settings hidden behind a CoinSpace login screen. It features multiple tokens though with built in conversion through ShapeShift, which could have been awesome. But the excessive ads are just a big no-no. Lack of SegWit and limited fee options make this one of the least interesting wallets out there.

Simple Bitcoin Wallet

Simple Bitcoin is a very basic, barebone wallet. Feels like a one-man project. Almost no settings possible at all. There's much better out there.

Bither

I oddly liked Bither because of its design that reminded me of websites from the 2005-ish era using lots of gradients. Its one of those apps that you either like or you don't. The UI is not bad, but could be better, there's some functionality hidden in the settings, but not enough to satisfy. One very useful feature is built in BCH and BCG extraction. This is the first app I encountered with built in Bitcoin Gold access. It also has a separate tab with just market price information, which is really useful for the price ticker addicts among us. Furthermore it features Cold/Hot Storage View which allows you to monitor cold ...
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Another method to claim bitcoin gold from Electrum 2 Factor Wallets

I tried using this tutorial to claim my BTG from my 2 factor Electrum wallet. I could never get the transaction to actually go through via the Bitcoin Gold Core wallet. I found another method, which uses this.
I can confirm that it works and the dev will not steal your BTG. Although there is about a 1% fee that gets sent to him, I have spent way too long trying to claim the BTG and it was worth it to me.
submitted by emanymdegnahc to BitcoinGoldHQ [link] [comments]

test

Hello all,
In this article i like to explain to you the Proof of Stake system that Particl use, and why it is exciting (Particl was officially launched July 17, 2017)
Specifics:
The Foundation receives a 10% of every stake to sustain long term development and hire more devs/bounties etc. one stake is currently 1.5 part.
Staking reward per year
first year 5%
second year 4%
third year 3%
forth year 2% ++
Auguste Kerckhoffs demanded that security must depend entirely or at least in large part on the key. He describes the requirements for secure encryption as follows: "A procedure is safe if you can not crack it, even though you know the code." In 1883, Auguste Kerckhoffs, in his book La Cryptographie Militaire, describes the following six rules derived from his studies of historical cryptography, which should be followed by everyone if he wants to keep his secret.
Source: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auguste_Kerckhoffs
With this in mind im totally excited about the solid Proof of Stake setup Particl uses. Particl a btcfork on latest bitcoin codebase 0.15x is designed to let everyone participate in the network (voting, passive income, p2p privacy market fees) while maintaining the security of the network.
To be honest, in key principles it is very simple, but all together it still is a lot of stuff to talk about. Cause Particl's Proof of Stake system is very different from other passive income systems.
But firstly everyone is able to participate since its very pure PoS (without masternodes or something similar, which means less centralization and more adoption in the long term)

Cold Staking

Cold Staking makes the whole staking process very secure, you will be able to stake from a virtual server with a public node (that dont have any funds on it, but it stakes your offline/cold storage coins and has only the ability to stake and not to spend any funds).
Besides that the PoS of Particl will get merged together with the Market features (voting and of course the Marketplace fees that gets flooded into the Rewards.
If Particl continues to get adopted in the e-commerce & cryptocurrencie space, this really is a factor everyone should ask themselves.
It is stil a bit of road to go and there are some other projects, but i cant see one that puts the whole vision of free and decentralized trading into one, while maintaining trustlessnes and simplicity.
Particl already has RingCT and CT working on Bitcoin Codebase & a legal foundation sitting in Switzerland.
Come join and earn passive income, while strengthen & supporting the network
You can calculate your stakes at different network weight (25%,50%,75%..) with the staking Calculator. Currently it is about 50-60%. (you can check via getstakinginfo command in cli or qt console) or in the partyman tool via ./partyman status
https://particl.wiki/staking
Name Downloads
Electron Gui Electron Gui
QT Wallet/CLI QT-Wallet
Mobile Wallet Copay App Android

Tutorials:

submitted by sexystick to PostPreview [link] [comments]

Advanced Bitcoin Scripting -- Part 1: Transactions & Multisig Bitcoin 101 - Multi-Signature Addresses pt1 - Coding This ... How To Create A Multisig Bitcoin Wallet: Caravan - YouTube How to create and use Multi Sig Bitcoin Wallets How To Use Bitcoin Multi-Signature with CoPay

Description []. Multisignature (multisig) refers to requiring more than one key to authorize a Bitcoin transaction.It is generally used to divide up responsibility for possession of bitcoins. Standard transactions on the Bitcoin network could be called “single-signature transactions,” because transfers require only one signature — from the owner of the private key associated with the ... Bitcoin multisig wallets can enable more secure custody of your bitcoin, adding redundancy and avoiding a single point of failure in the number of keys necessary to authorize a spend. Video: How to Create a Multisig Wallet With Caravan By Unchained Capital Reden wir über Multisig. Wie kann man eine Bitcoin-Adresse auf mehrere Leute aufteilen? Wie bildet man komplexe Multisig-Verträge, und, vor allem: mit welcher Wallet kann man sie einigermaßen bequem benutzen? Außerdem erklären wir, wie Multisig technologisch funktioniert und warum mehr passiert, als dass ein privater Schlüssel zerschnitten . Gesellschaft für Informatik lädt zum Bitcoin ... Bitcoin Wallet, multisig, Tutorial. Spot-markets for Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Ripple, Litecoin and more. Start your trading here. Show comments. In Case You Missed It. The Silk Road Balance Sheet ... Pybitcointools Multisig Tutorial. by Vitalik Buterin. March 13, 2014 . There has been a large amount of interest in multisignature transaction technology in the past year, especially with the recent announcement of CryptoCorp. If you want to play with multisig technology yourself on the command line, here are the gritty details of how to do it. First, run sudo pip install bitcoin to install ...

[index] [48987] [42768] [25737] [48057] [5425] [14680] [50181] [42038] [5938] [20045]

Advanced Bitcoin Scripting -- Part 1: Transactions & Multisig

Today I check out how to use a multi signature wallet via the CoPay platform. Tip Address: 1CwYp77iDHy2XFoV1LLEeJA3t8ynF5ZzAd Bitpay Wallet Tutorial: https:/... This is useful if you want more than one person to be required to 'sign off' or 'authorize' any outgoing Bitcoin wallet transaction. This is also a great security measure for your own personal ... Just like the Wright brothers, on those first flights at Kitty Hawk, didn't concern themselves that much with landing. And improvements like anti-lock brakes... This is the first part of a more technical talk where Andreas explores Bitcoin script, with examples from the 2nd edition of Mastering Bitcoin, focusing on the use of conditional statements, flow ... SHOW RESOURCES: Use Caravan Now: https://unchained-capital.github.io/caravan/#/ Buy a Ledger 3 Pack: https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-nano-x-3pack?r=f...

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